Writing Courses

Program Requirements (2017-18)

Visit this link for the updated 2017-18 Writing and Rhetoric program description and list of courses.

List of Innis College Writing and Rhetoric Courses on offer in 2016-17:

 

INI 103H1F Writing Essays
INI 203Y1Y Foundations of Written Discourse
INI 204Y1Y The Academic Writing Process
INI 300H1F Strategic Writing in Business and the Professions
INI 302H1F,S Writing in Business and the Professions for Rotman Commerce students
INI 305H1S Word and Image in Modern Writing
INI 310H1F,S Editing
INI 311Y1Y Seminar in Creative Writing
INI 410H1S Analyzing Creative Non-Fiction

JEI 206H1F Writing English Essays



INI 103H1F

WRITING ESSAYS

Introduces the fundamentals of essay writing within an interdisciplinary context. Includes the history of the essay and its various rhetorical modes (narrative, descriptive, expository, argumentative), with a focus on humanities and social sciences essays. Both non-academic essays and essays from across the academic disciplines are examined in terms of purpose, audience, and persuasive strategies.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None
Method of instruction: lecture/discussion
Instructor: Viktoria Jovanovic-Krstic
FALL 2016

Lecture: Mondays 1-3, Location Innis Town Hall (IN112)
TUT0101: M3; Location IN312
TUT0102: M4; Location IN312
TUT0201: W3; Location IN312

 

INI 104H1

WRITING REPORTS (not offered in 2016-17)

Introduces the fundamentals of report writing within an interdisciplinary context. This writing intensive course focuses on improving writing skills appropriate to report writing genres. Informal, formal, research, and professional workplace reports are examined in terms of purpose, audience, structure, style, persuasive strategies, and use of visual rhetoric (tables, charts, graphs).

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None
Method of instruction: lecture/discussion

 

INI 203Y1Y

FOUNDATIONS OF WRITTEN DISCOURSE

Designed to teach students to write persuasively and to recognize persuasive strategies at work in writing they analyze. Classical rhetorical terms, elements of style, and modes of argument are central to the course. Assignments include a rhetorical analysis, in-class essays, and a term essay. Readings include prose from a variety of disciplines, excluding fiction and poetry. Students who enrol in the course must demonstrate competence in the English language.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)
Method of instruction: lecture/discussion
Instructor: Vikki Visvis
Lecture: Thursdays 10-1, Location IN204

 

 

INI 204Y1Y

THE ACADEMIC WRITING PROCESS

The strategy necessary to write complete pieces of non-fiction prose, especially exposition and argument. Concepts of planning and organization include: focusing, research, outlining, patterns of logical development, introduction, paragraph development, conclusion, argumentation and persuasion, documentation, and revision. Students for whom English is a second language should have an advanced level of fluency in English before enrolling.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)
Method of instruction: lecture/discussion
Instructor: Rory McKeown
Lecture: Mondays 6-9, IN312

 

INI 300H1F

STRATEGIC WRITING IN BUSINESS AND THE PROFESSIONS

Aims to teach students to recognize the rhetoric of the professional workplace and to communicate strategically and ethically using written and oral discourse appropriate to business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. Case study analysis using ethical reasoning models is a central component of the course.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Exclusion: INI300Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)
Method of instruction: lecture/discussion
Instructor: Viktoria Jovanovic-Krstic
FALL 2016

Lecture: Thursdays 2-5, Location LM155

 

INI 301H1

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND WRITTEN DISCOURSE: RHETORIC AND THE PRINT MEDIA (not offered in 2016-17)

Examines how the language and rhetoric of print media shape social issues. Rhetorical strategies at work in the media reporting of such controversial issues as international crises and military actions are examined. The construction of the columnists persona and the role of editorials are also examined.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)
Method of instruction: lecture/discussion

 

INI 302H1F,S

WRITING IN BUSINESS AND THE PROFESSIONS FOR ROTMAN COMMERCE STUDENTS

Designed for and restricted to undergraduates in Rotman Commerce. Assignments and course aims reflect the learning goals of the Rotman Commerce program. This course focuses on critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and the rhetoric of the world of business. The theory and practice of written and oral communication are also central. Case study analysis using ethical reasoning models is a central pedagogical tool.

Prerequisite: Completion of 10.0 full-course equivalents.
Exclusion: INI300Y1/INI300H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)
Method of instruction: lecture/discussion
Instructor: Viktoria Jovanovic-Krstic

FALL 2016
INI302H1F, Fall Lecture: Mondays 3-5, Location SS2127
INI302H1F, Fall TUT0101: Tuesdays 1-2, Location BL112
INI302H1F, Fall TUT0201: Thursdays 1-2, Location BL112

WINTER 2016
INI302H1S, Winter Lecture: Mondays 3-5, Location SS2127
INI302H1S, Winter TUT0101: Tuesdays 1-2, Location IN204
INI302H1S, Winter TUT0201: Thursdays 1-2, Location IN204


INI 304H1S

CRITICAL THINKING AND INQUIRY IN WRITTEN COMMUNICATION (not offered in 2016-17)

This seminar in critical reading, analysis, and writing focuses on the nature, the evaluation, and the use and abuse of evidence in the process of formulating and supporting an argument. The case study method will be employed to assess the level of authority, credibility, and objectivity evident in public discourse, official sources, and academic inquiry.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)
Method of instruction: lecture/discussion

 

INI 305H1S

WORD AND IMAGE IN MODERN WRITING

The rhetorical term Ekphrasis, which refers to writing that is about visual art, is central in the examination of the persuasive power of the conversation or discourse that is produced when the written word attempts the evocation of visual images. Course readings will include ekphrastic texts drawn from several disciplines and genres: journalism, informal essays, poetry, and scholarly writing.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)
Instructor: Katherine Fry

WINTER 2017
Lecture: Wednesdays 12-3, IN312

 

INI 310H1F,S

EDITING

A study of professional editorial conventions, focusing on three stages of the editorial process: substantive editing, stylistic editing, and copy editing. As students learn these stages, they enhance their critical thinking, sharpen their language skills, and practise strategies for strengthening their own writing and the writing of others.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FALL 2016
Lecture: Mondays 3-6, IN204
Instructor: Rebecca Vogan

WINTER 2016
Lecture: Mondays 3-6, IN204
Instructor: Rebecca Vogan

 

INI 311Y1Y

SEMINAR IN CREATIVE WRITING

This workshop course examines methodological approaches to literary fiction from the perspective of the creator. Through course readings, discussion, and creative writing assignments, student writers will learn how prose writers combine stylistic techniques, point-of-view, setting, character, scenes, and structure to produce literary effects.

Prerequisite: Experience or strong interest in writing fiction. 4.0 full-course equivalents, fluency in English.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)
Method of instruction: seminar/discussion
Instructor: Sharon English
Lecture: Wednesdays 3-6, IN204

 

INI 410H1S

ANALYZING CREATIVE NON-FICTION (not offered in 2016-17)

In INI 410: Analyzing Creative Nonfiction, students will investigate nonfiction writing from a range of forms, including music journalism, science writing, war reportage, memoir, collage, and the graphic novel. We will read current work by contemporary writers like David Shields, Eula Biss, Rebecca Skloot, Katherine Boo and Jesmyn Ward, along with pieces by masters such as George Orwell, Joan Didion, James Baldwin and David Foster Wallace.

Creative nonfiction is any writing about “real” events that borrows techniques from fiction, poetry and rhetoric in order to communicate a truth—one that can be cultural, political, or emotional, even when these truths are at odds.  As with any kind of literature, the creative nonfiction writer’s aim is to hide the seams of the work, so that the reader is totally immersed in the world of the story. Therefore, to unravel how a piece pulls off its tricks, the analyst must learn how to be as deft as the writer.

We will explore how, why and when a piece works by using an arsenal of analytical tools, for example, sentence segmentation and reverse storyboarding. We will learn to identify key literary techniques and understand their power—techniques such as narrative distance, vantage point, and filtering. We will discuss a few of pop culture’s recent villains, like Shia LaBeouf, James Frey and Mike Daisey. And we will also try to answer some of the genre’s pressing concerns at this lively time in its history. What is a creative nonfiction writer’s responsibility to real, living subjects? If art always imitates life, and if memory is fundamentally flawed, does the distinction between fiction and nonfiction make sense? How “true” does a piece of creative nonfiction really have to be?

 

Prerequisite: 4.0 full-course equivalents (permission of instructor is not required)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)
Method of instruction: seminar/discussion

 

INI413H1S

VISUAL RHETORIC OF THE AESTHETIC MOVEMENT

(Added September 27, 2016) *CANCELLED October 11, 2016*

Explores the role of writing and rhetoric in the shaping of material culture and public taste in Victorian illustrated magazines and newspapers in the Aesthetic period (1860-1900). The Great Exhibition of 1851 will provide the context for this study of texts and objects, including the decorative arts. [36L]

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Recommended Preparation: INI103H1 / INI203Y1 / INI204Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities 
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

WINTER 2017

T11-2; Location IN313
Instructor: Cynthia Messenger

 

JEI 206H1S

WRITING ENGLISH ESSAYS

This course teaches students who already write effectively how to write clear, compelling, research-informed English essays. The course aims to help students recognize the function of grammar and rhetoric, the importance of audience, and the persuasive role of style.

This course is open to both English Department students and students enrolled in the Writing and Rhetoric Program. It counts as an INI course toward the completion of Writing and Rhetoric Program requirements. In 2015-16, it is offered in the fall term only.

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE. English students have priority.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

WINTER 2017
Lecture:

M1-3; Location TBA

Tut W1, W2 or W3 (see here for locations)
Instructor: Cynthia Messenger

Course outline