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Munk Centre
 

EVENTS 2007-2008

All events are free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Thursday, September 27, 12-2 pm
Halyna Chybiskova (Jacyk Visiting Scholar, Institute of Economics and International Studies Forecasting, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), “Biofuels in Ukraine: How to Make Them Work” (download presentation)
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, October 5, 6-8 pm
George Grabowicz  (Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyj Professor of Ukrainian Literature, Harvard University ), “Taras Shevchenko: the Poet and the Painter”
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Department of History.

Monday, October 15, 6-8 pm
Mychailo Wynnyckyj (Kyiv-Mohyla Business School, Ukraine), “Ukraine from Elections to Elections: Building Political Culture through Conflict”(download presentation)
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday, October 18, 12-2 pm
Ilya Repin and Ukraine
Speakers: Thomas M. Prymak and Mark Zadorozny
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Wednesday, October 31, 6-8 pm
Roundtable on the Parliamentary Elections in Ukraine
Participants: H.E. Ihor Ostash, Ukrainian Ambassador to Canada, Ilko Kucheriv, Director, Democratic Initiatives, Ukraine, Dominique Arel, University of Ottawa, Oleh Havrylyshyn, University of Toronto
Chair:  Lucan Way, University of Ottawa.
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.
                               
Thursday, November 1, 10 am-5 pm
The Holodomor of 1932-33: a 75th Anniversary Conference on the Ukrainian Famine-Genocide.

Video recording of the event is avalable at http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Webcasts.aspx

Conference coverage in English and in Ukrainian

10:00 am         Welcome note: Wsevolod Isajiw (University of Toronto)
Opening remarks by H.E. Ihor Ostash, Ukrainian Ambassador to Canada and Zenon Kohut, (Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies)

10:30 am-12:30 pm    Panel I: Archival Sources
Hennadii Boriak (Deputy Director, State Committee on Archives of Ukraine), “Holodomor Archives and Sources: The State of the Art”
Iryna Matiash (Ukrainian Research Institute of Archival Affairs and Document Studies), “Archives in Russia on the Famine in Ukraine”
Commentator: Lynne Viola (University of Toronto)
Chair: Roman Serbyn (Université du Québec à Montréal)

1:30- 3:00 pm             Panel II: Historiography
Liudmyla Hrynevych (Institute of Political and Ethnic Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), “The Present State and Prospects of Development of Ukrainian Historiography of Holodomor”
Commentator: Terry Martin (Harvard University)
Chair: Frank Sysyn (University of Alberta)

3:30-5:00 pm              Panel III: Politics and Society
Mykola Riabchuk (University of Alberta), “The Famine in Contemporary Ukrainian Politics and Society”
Commentator: Dominique Arel (University of Ottawa)
Chair: Peter Solomon (University of Toronto)

Concluding remarks: Yuriy A. Sergeyev (Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of Ukraine to the United Nations)

Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, University of Toronto, the Ukrainian Canadian Research and Documentation Centre in cooperation with Buduchnist Credit Union Foundation, Toronto Ukrainian Charitable Fund, and the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch.

Thursday, November 22, 7:00 - 10:00 p.m.
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

Following the tradition of bringing the newest and best in contemporary Ukrainian filmmaking, the November 22 presentation by the Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University at U-of-T will showcase "New Films and New Names from Ukraine". The program presents recent and never before screened in Canada films: Bozhychi,  by Anastasia Kharchenko, Prison Mamas, by Taras Tomenko, Heaven, by Nadia Koshman, as well as the critically acclaimed and much talked about Taxi Driver, by the newest Ukrainian cinematographic sensation Roman Bondarchuk.

Introduction by Yuri Shevchuk, the Director of the Ukrainian Film Club; Lecturer of Ukrainian Language and Culture at the Columbia University
Innis Townhall, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Tuesday, November 27, 12-2 pm
Ilko Kucheriv
(Director, Democratic Initiatives Foundation, Ukraine),” Embracing Euro-Atlantic Values: EU and NATO Information Campaign in Ukraine after 2007 Parliamentary Elections”
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Thursday, December 6, 4-6 pm
Keith Darden (Yale University), “Mass Schooling and the Formation of Enduring National Loyalties: The Case of Ukraine”. Commentator: Paul Magocsi (University of Toronto). Chair: Lucan Way (University of Toronto).
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

January 17, 4-6 pm
Mykola Posivnych (Kolasky Visiting Fellow, Jacyk Visiting scholar; Ivan Kryp'iakevych Instute of Ukrainian Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), "Ukrainian Liberation Movement and Activities of NKVD-MGB-KGB in the 1940s-50s" (In Ukrainian)
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday-Saturday, January 24-26
Graduate Student Symposium
New Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine: Politics, History and Culture
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.                     

Thursday, January 31, 12-2 pm
Sofia Ryabchuk (Jacyk Visiting Scholar; Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine), “The Crisis of Masculinity in the Texts of Ukrainian Avant-Garde”      
(1 Devonshire Place)
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, February 1, 6-8 pm
Colour Revolutions in the Post-communist Space: Screening and Discussion

Chair: Lucan Way, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
A screening of a documentary Colour Me Free (48 min) followed by a discussion on the wave of democracy and authoritarianism in the post-communism space.

Film Synopsis: At the beginning of the 2000's it seemed as if the world was going to experience a fourth wave of democratization. In 2003 Georgia had their rose revolution, in 2004 Ukraine had their orange revolution and the 2005 Kyrgyzstan had their tulip revolution. All of them came as a consequence of election fraud, so everything seemed to build up towards the 2006 Belarusian presidential election. Unfortunately for Belarus, their revolution blue did not carry the day.
The film was recently chosen as an official selection for the 2007 Montreal World Film Festival and the Bergen International Film Festival in Bergen, Norway.

Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday, February 28, 7-10 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence
The Unnamed Zone, 2006.

A Spanish film crew is following the stories of three young Ukrainians directly affected by the worst nuclear disaster in human history at the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Station which occurred on April 26, 1986. Three children – Lidia Pidvalna, Anastasia Pavlenko, and Andriy Kovalchuk – and their families living perilously close to the exclusion zone around the destroyed station recount their fears, dreams, fantasies, and hopes for the future.

The screening will be followed by Q &A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director. The event is free and open to the public. The film will be shown in its Ukrainian language version with English subtitles.
Innis Townhall, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Friday, February 29, 6-8 pm
“Revisiting Great Ukrainian Film Classics: Oleksandr Dovzhenko's Zvenyhora
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the the Ukrainian Film Club at the Columia University.

The event will showcase Oleksander Dovzhenko’s silent masterpiece Zvenyhora, 1927. The picture is the first part in his filmic triptych of Ukraine that also includes Arsenal and Earth. It is Dovzhenko’s metaphor of a thousand years of Ukrainian history, from the first Kyivan princes to the Russian Bolshevik war against independent Ukraine. The main protagonist is an old man, ageless, ingenuous, enterprising, cunning and indestructible – Dovzhenko’s personification of the Ukrainian spirit. The old man’s life is a hunt for a hidden treasure, a symbol of Ukraine’s sole and its, yet unlocked, spiritual potential.

Yuri Shevchuk, the Director of the Ukrainian Film Club and Lecturer of Ukrainian Language and Culture at the Columbia University, will introduce the film and mediate the post-screening discussion. A recently restored VUFKU 1927 original edition of Zvenyhora will be screened with the English translation of Ukrainian intertitles. The event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, March 6, 12-1:30 pm
CERES Faculty Speakers' Series: Crossdisciplinary Discussion in Area Studies
Lucan Way
(Department of Political Science, University of Toronto), "Rethinking the Coloured Revolutions"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=4585
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by CERES.

The defeat of post-Communist autocrats in Serbia in 2000, Georgia in 2003, Ukraine in 2004, and Kyrgyzstan in 2005 inspired a rich and extensive literature on regime change by some of the best comparativists in the field. Yet, I contend that some of the most prominent theories from this literature do not adequately explain why some post-Communist autocrats fell and others have survived. In particular, I contend that regional diffusion, opposition strategy, and the extent of popular protest were less important than many assume. I offer an alternative framework rooted in linkage to the West and autocratic state and party power that provides a better understanding of the causes of the coloured revolutions.

Monday, March 17, 4-6 pm
Oleksiy Tolochko (Jacyk Visiting Scholar; Institute of Ukrainian History, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), “The Origins of "The Radzivill Chronicle”
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

The Radziwill Chronicle is the only surviving medieval illuminated codex with a chronicle text. Traditionally, it is viewed as a faithful replica of the now-lost early thirteenth-century original. In spite of intensive research both of the text and its illustrations, the manuscript remains rather enigmatic: it is not quite clear where or when it was produced, nor how accurately it reproduces the original. By examining of the codex’s illustrations, the lecture suggests answers to some of these questions.

Monday, March 31, 6-8 pm
Panel: "Media in Ukraine"
Mykola Riabchuk
(Visiting Scholar, University of Alberta), "Benign Neglect or Feckless Engagement? Mass Media and Politics of Memory in Post-Soviet Ukraine"
Marta Dyczok (University of Western Ontario), "Do the Media Matter? Focus on Ukraine"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=5905
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Modern societies and politics are inconceivable without mass media and communications, sitting as they do at the intersection of overlapping spheres of influence and power - politics, economics, and technology. Although most analysts agree that there are 'complex and powerful links between mass media and the national political system' (McQuail 1990, 1992), and that 'beyond doubt, the mass media represent an important variable in the process of social change,' (Kunczik 1984), there is no consensus among scholars on the main question, what role does the mass media play in political and social change? Marta Dyczok focuses these questions on contemporary Ukraine, and suggests that despite the continuing belief in the power of media, the role media is playing is rather ambiguous.

From the first days of national independendence, Ukraine’s postcommunist leaders have been torn by the two opposite imperatives. On the one side, they had to embark on the state-nation building project that meant, in particular, promotion of a new national identity and a new historical narrative that binds people together and legitimizes their emancipation from the former colonial masters. Yet, on the other hand, since they had been themselves loyal servants of those masters for many decades and, in fact, represented them in the country, they eventually had to silence some important anti-colonial and anticommunist overtones of that narrative, or even to mute them altogether. Mykola Riabchuk argues that mass media have been playing an important role in this process, reflecting highly ambiguous, incoherent, and overtly opportunistic politics of memory pursued by the post-Soviet elite within the past decade and a half.

Thursday, April 3, 6-8 pm
Peter J. Potichnyj (Professor Emeritus, McMaster University), Roman Shukhevych and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army: Myths and Realities”
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Wolodymyr Dylynsky Memorial Fund at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, in co-operation with the CIUS Toronto Office and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, University of Toronto.

Peter J. Potichnyj received MA & PhD in Government & Politics from Columbia University, New York, USA. He also obtained Diploma in Soviet Studies from the Russian Institute, Columbia University. He is author, co-author and   editor of   some 18 books on Soviet, Ukrainian and East European issues and Editor-in-Chief   of   “The Litopys UPA”, an ongoing documentary series of which 66 volumes have appeared to date. In 1945-47, he served in the UPA and during the Korean War in the United States Marine Corps.

Friday, May 9, 3:30-4:30 pm
Antoine Arjakovsky (Ukrainian Catholic University),"Orthodox Christianity, Islam, and Fundamentalisms: Before A General Catastrophe"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6142
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by CERES and the
Ukrainian Catholic Educational Foundation.

Dr. Antoine Arjakovsky received a Master's degree from the Sorbonne and a Doctorate from the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales(EHESS) in Paris. Dr. Arjakovsky is currently the Director of the Institute of Ecumenical Studies at the Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv (appointed in 2004), where he teaches courses in contemporary Orthodox theology, the history of the ecumenical movement, and contemporary Christian anthropology. He previously taught at Lomonosov State University in Moscow, the Centre Sèvres in Paris, and the Mohyla National Academy in Kyiv. He served as the cultural attaché of the French Embassy in Kyiv in 1998-2002, and of the French Embassy in Moscow in 1994-1998, at which time he was also the director of the Collège Universitaire Français MGOU in the Russian capital.

 



 

 


   
Content: © 2002 Petro Jacyk • Design: © 2002 dragandesign.