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Munk Centre
 

 

All events are free and open to the public, but registration is required.
EVENTS 2008-2009

Friday, October 3, 12-2 pm
Roundtable "Ukraine after the Georgian Conflict"

Speakers: Alexander Motyl, Rutgers University, Dominique Arel, University of Ottawa, Lucan Way, University of Toronto
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6319
Room 23, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Speakers will discuss the impact of the conflict between Georgia and Russia on Ukrainian domestic politics and external relations with Russia. How has the conflict affected the balance of power between different parties and factions inside Ukraine? Do these events augur more serious conflict between Russia and Ukraine in Crimea? How do these events affect Ukraine's prospects to join NATO and the EU?

Monday, October 6, 1-4 pm
WorkshopHow and Why Europe Matters: The Role of the European Court of Human Rights in Russia and Ukraine”
Chair: Peter Solomon (CERES)
Speakers: Alina Cherviatsova (Jacyk Visiting Scholar; Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Kharazin University, Ukraine)
Alexei Trochev (Postdoctoral fellow, Faculty of Law, University of Wisconsin)
Nikolai Kovalev (Postdoctoral fellow, CERES; Adjunct Professor, Law Faculty, University of Toronto)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6212
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Institute of European Studies. Funding for this event is provided in part by the European Commission

Thursday, October 16, 7-10 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

True to tradition, the series will introduce new films from Ukraine to the Greater Toronto audience. The program under the same title NEW FILMS FROM UKRAINE features three Canadian premiers of recent and yet unseen in North America works: by the internationally renowned director Kira Muratova “Dummy”, an intricately woven detective story with a surprise ending; by two young female filmmakers - Nadia Koshman with “Fireflies”, a short feature about emotional attachment between two kids; and by Hanna Yarovenko, a short documentary “Fiesta”, about Ukrainian folk music and its growing attraction for modern urban youth.

Dummy, 2007
Director: Kira Muratova
Length: 32 min
This is Muratova’s take on the essence of happiness and different understandings thereof by different people. Is it morally justified to make a person happy for at least a couple of hours by lying to them and breaking all the basic moral norms?

Fireflies, 2005
Director: Nadia Koshman
Length: 36 min.
A city boy Sirozhka is taken for the summer to his grandmother's place in the countryside. There, he discovers the Ukrainian village with its distinct rhythm of life, customs, and its quiet irresistible beauty. Most importantly he befriends a local girl Katia.

Fiesta, 2007
Director: Hanna Yarovenko
Length: 30 min

The protagonist is Mykhailo Koval, a retired village teacher, polyglot, bandura-player, and a great enthusiast of folk culture in its endless manifestations – music, crafts, embroidery, myth, theatre. His retirement marked a new chapter in his life – an indefatigable popularization of folk culture in his native village and around the country.

The screening will be followed by Q &A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director. The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.
Innis Townhall, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Friday, October 17, 12-2 pm
John Jaworsky
, (University of Waterloo), "The Black Sea Fleet, Sevastopol, and Ukrainian-Russian Relations"
Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6715
Room 108N, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1
Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Prof. John (Ivan) Jaworsky has a PhD from Carleton University, and has taught and conducted research at the University of Waterloo (Department of Political Science) since 1987. The main themes of his research are: civil-military relations in Ukraine; inter-ethnic relations in Ukraine; and the dissident movement and dissident legacy in Ukraine.

Friday, October 17, 6-8 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

In the second installment of the program "An Unknown Oleksandr Dovzhenko" the full-length feature film "Ivan" by the founder of Ukrainian national cinema will be screened.

Made in 1932 on the eve of the Holodomor (Great Famine-Genocide in Ukraine), the film-poem is about the construction of the Dnipro Hydroelectric Power Station (Dniprohes), about the life of a country lad by the name of Ivan, who along with other youths comes to build one of the greatest constructions of the Soviet industrialization. Dovzhenko depicts the process of the protagonists transformation caused by industrialization.
Awards: The Venice International Film Festival, 1934, Award for the Best Program presented by a State (USSR)
.

Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the the Ukrainian Film Club at the Columbia University.

Thursday, November 6, 6-8 pm
Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture
Alex Hinton
(Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights; Associate Professor of Anthropology and Global Affairs and at Rutgers University, Newark), “Genocide by Famine? The Cambodian and Ukrainian Cases Compared”
Registration:http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
New location: Combination Room, Trinity College (6 Hoskin Avenue)
Co-sponsored by the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch, the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the South East Asia Seminar Series.

Alex Hinton is Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights and Associate Professor of Anthropology and Global Affairs at Rutgers University, Newark. He is the author of “Why Did They Kill? Cambodia in the Shadow of Genocide”(California, 2005) and five edited or co-edited collections, “Genocide: Truth, Memory, and Representation”(Duke, forthcoming), “Night of the Khmer Rouge: Genocide and Democracy in Cambodia” (Paul Robeson Gallery, 2007), “Annihilating Difference: The Anthropology of Genocide” (California, 2002), “Genocide: An Anthropological Reader” (Blackwell, 2002), and “Biocultural Approaches to the Emotions" (Cambridge, 1999). He is currently working on several other book projects, including an edited volume, “Local Justice”, a book on 9/11 and Abu Ghraib, and a book on the politics of memory and justice in the aftermath of the Cambodian genocide. He serves as an Academic Advisor to the Documentation Center of Cambodia, on the International Advisory Boards of the “Journal of Genocide Research” and “Genocide Studies and Prevention”, on the Executive Board of the Institute for the Study of Genocide, as the editor of the Palgrave book series, "Culture, Mind, and Society," and as the Second Vice-President and Executive Board member of The International Association of Genocide Scholars.

Friday, November 14, 12-2 pm
Natalka Patsiurko
(Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow in Ukrainian Politics, Culture, and Society), "CIRCUMVENTING THE STATE: Illegal Labour Migration from Ukraine as a Strategy within the Informal Economy"(presentation in PDF)
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 3130, Sidney Smith Hall (100 St. George Street)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

The presentation examines major trends of labour migration from contemporary Ukraine. It argues that labour migration from Eastern Europe receives insufficient attention in academic literature, which is dominated by accounts of emigration and human trafficking. I demonstrate how cotemporary labour migration from Ukraine to Southern Europe emerges from, and is sustained by, the interaction of the informal economies in the sending and receiving countries. The informal economy is instrumental in perpetuating migration, creating the access to the new labour market, and supporting the stay of migrants in the receiving society. This argument is demonstrated by studying the case of the Ukrainian labour migrants in Italy.

Tuesday, November 18, 2 - 4 pm
Volodymyr Kravchenko, "Ukrainian-Russian Borderland Identities: Kharkiv"
(in Ukrainian)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6926
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Co-sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine. 

Prof. Kravchenko is Head of the Department of Ukrainian Studies and Director of the Eastern Institute of Ukrainian Studies at Kharkiv National University, and Editor in Chief of the scholarly journal Skhid-Zakhid.

Monday, January 12, 1-2 pm
Olena Haleta (Director, Center for the Humanities, Department of the Theory of Literature and Comparative Literary Studies, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv), “The Anthology as a Way to the Literary Ontology in Ukrainian Literature of the 20th Century”.
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6325
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday, January 29, 3-5 pm
Serhy Yekelchyk (Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies, University of Victoria), "Stalinist Elections as a Soviet Political Ritual: Kyiv, 1946-1953"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=5714
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

The outcome of elections under Stalin was never in doubt – but if so, why did the state insist on holding them? After all, Stalin did not care to convene party congresses for thirteen years. Yet, during the difficult period of postwar reconstruction federal, republican, and local elections were held one after another almost every year between 1946 and 1953, and each election was preceded by an elaborate electoral campaign. What were the authorities getting out of these events? What, if anything, did the voters get out of this? Using the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv as a case study, this paper seeks answers in a close reading of contemporary archival documents.

Friday, February 13, 5 - 7 pm
Ukraine's Cultural Landscape
A discussion on the contemporary cultural life in Ukraine by a Ukrainian team of sculptors who came to Canada to compete in the ice sculpture contest at Quebec's Winter Festival 2009. It is accompanied by screening of a documentary Volodymyr Ivasyuk: My Life is a Broken String (2007) as well as animation and short feature films.
This event is in Ukrainian.

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7293
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday, February 26, 12 - 2 pm
Maureen Murney
(Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto), Gender and Politics: Constructions and Experiences of Alcohol Addiction in Western Ukraine
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7091
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Two models of the ‘authentic’ Ukrainian woman are imagined as forms of feminine reclamation in the post-Soviet era. Late twentieth-century nationalists have recreated the Berehynia as goddess of the hearth, protector of family and nation. An alternative, which Ukrainian ethnographer Oksana Kis (2005) dubs the hyper-feminine Barbie, and describes as “a pretty and expensive doll” and “a pleasant man’s toy,” is more globally-informed. The most successful Barbie is one who attracts a husband, enabling her to simultaneously act out the role of the Berehynia. Both models define the accepted ‘centre’ and unaccepted ‘margins’ of women’s citizenship in the nation-state.

            Gendered ideologies are deeply implicated in constructions of and responses to alcohol addiction in western Ukraine. Problematic drinking among men is met with a sympathy that women do not enjoy. For men, addiction reveals their inherent inflexibility, an inability to adopt or adapt to a changing social, economic and political “system of priorities and values.” For women, addiction primarily signifies a conscious abandonment of the sacred duty to protect family and nation. A difference is recognized between acceptable social suffering, that which provides laudable evidence of bravery, strength and endurance (e.g., coping with a husband’s or son’s addiction), and the unacceptable social suffering of those who have “fallen,” who have not overcome their personal circumstances to embody ‘authentic’ Ukrainian femininity. Many research participants, including health care professionals, recognize little or no relationship between addiction and a “lack of self-realisation,” family problems including violence, and anxiety brought on by social and economic pressures. Rather, addiction is most often attributed to a lack of moral fortitude. Accordingly, women who become addicted to alcohol are seen to have consciously rejected the very essence of Ukrainian womanhood. As such, women are especially reluctant to “confess” and seek treatment. The presentation will examine the relationship between addiction, gender, stigma and nationalism. Focussing upon the everyday experiences of women and men who self-identify as alcoholics or recovering alcoholics, I will explore the multiple ways that women pursue healing, and simultaneously, a shift from a marginalized periphery to a moral centre.

Tuesday, March 3, 3-5 pm
Daniel Bilak, Partner with the London, UK law firm, CMS Cameron McKenna, in the firm’s Ukraine practice, “Is Ukraine a Failed State? Crisis, Confidence and Corruption”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7403
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Having worked in the private and public sectors in Ukraine since 1991, Dan served for over ten years as a United Nations-sponsored senior governance adviser on rule of law, anti-corruption and public administration issues to two Ukrainian Prime Ministers, the Vice-Prime Ministers of Ukraine for Economic Affairs and for European Integration, the Cabinet Secretariat, and was twice chief of staff to the Minister of Justice of Ukraine, focusing on transparency, accountability and anti-corruption strategies in the Ukrainian justice system.

Following the “Orange Revolution” in December 2004, Dan was appointed a Member of the UNDP-sponsored Blue Ribbon Commission providing recommendations on a new wave of reforms to newly-elected President Victor Yushchenko and co-authored the proposals on judicial reform, governance and administrative reform. He was then was appointed by the President of Ukraine to the National Commission on the Strengthening of Democracy and the Rule of Law, established to direct Ukraine’s European integration process.

Dan has also advised the governments of Bulgaria and Lithuania with respect to the transformation of their respective systems of administrative justice.

Thursday, March 5, 2:30-4 pm
Daniel Caron
(Ambassador of Canada to Ukraine), “Ukraine: Trends and Perspectives”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7228
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Daniel Caron, Ambassador of Canada to Ukraine since July 2008, will talk about Ukraine, its role in the region, its relations with NATO, the EU, Russia and Georgia and Canada-Ukraine bilateral relations; his presentation will be followed by a question period and discussion. Ambassador Caron has occupied several senior positions with the Government of Canada over the last 27 years. Prior to his nomination as Ambassador of Canada to Ukraine, he was deputy head of mission and minister-counsellor at the Embassy of Canada in Mexico. He served at the Mission of Canada to the European Union in Brussels and as trade commissioner at the Consulate General of Canada in Boston.  In Ottawa, he occupied positions in the Japan Division, the Northern Europe Division, he was part of the Canadian team that negotiated with France fishing rights around Saint-Pierre and Miquelon and completed an assignment as regional director with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

Thursday, March 5, 7-10 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

The series will present THE LIVING (2008), Serhiy Bukovsky's new feature documentary on the Holodomor . The non-commercial free-of-charge screening of the film will be a de-facto Canadian premier of this critically acclaimed film by one of the most accomplished documentary filmmakers Ukraine has today.

SYNOPSIS: They were children when everything was taken away from their parents. Children of farmers who lived on and tilled the world’s most fertile soil and who were thrown into the grip of hunger to die a slow agonizing death. Those who survived were destined to serve as an obedient army of slaves… Only now are these people beginning to talk about their experience. How their parents were whipped and driven towards a “bright future”. How every last possession was taken away. How whole villages were dying. And how they survived, despite it all… “I wish our generation had never been born,” says one of the witnesses. 

The film interlaces the Holodomor tragedy with the global upheavals of the early 1930s: the collapse of economy in the USA, Hitler’s coming to power in Germany, Stalin’s war with the peasantry. This last group was defending private property, so they either had to acknowledge defeat, or die. But in 1933 peasants were left with no choice. The Ukrainian problem–any display of independent national policy–was meant to be solved at the same time.

The film also tells the story of Gareth Jones, a British journalist, whose investigative reporting was not heard in the West. Jones acts as a guide in this journey through history. Governments of numerous countries showed indifference to the suffering, even though they were informed about the situation in Ukraine. This is evident from numerous documents shown in the film. Stories of people who survived the Great Famine are interlaced with these documents and fragments of Gareth’s diaries, which he kept during his trip to Ukraine in March of 1933.

“What is your dream, baba Nastia?” Sergiy Bukovskiy asks one of the survivors. Her answer is short: “Death”. But these aging men and women, who survived hell on earth, are so real, so living and natural… They bring an agricultural society back to its feet and make it master of its own land. Only the living can rise again. 

"The Living is the best documentary film on the history of Ukraine I have ever seen. The filmmakers have achieved what no one before them was fully able to do-–to combine true historical facts and a genuinely emotional experience, and to present Ukrainian history in the context of world history. The result is not only a monument to those who perished [in the Holodomor] and a tribute to the survivors, but also a fervent, dignified missive to their descendants." Serhii Plokhii, the Hrushevsky Professor of Ukrainian History, Harvard University

The film was funded by the International Charitable Fund “Ukraine 3000”

The screening will be followed by Q &A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director. The event is free and open to the public.
Innis Townhall, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave
Sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Friday, March 6, 3-6 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

The series will present S. Bukovsky's documentary SPELL YOUR NAME (2006). Produced by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education, made possible by a generous grant from Victor Pinchuk, and in continued partnership with the Victor Pinchuk Foundation, Spell Your Name is a feature-length documentary about the Holocaust in Ukraine.

Bukovsky crafted the film using Ukrainian and Russian-language testimonies from the USC Shoah Foundation Institute archive and new footage shot on location in Ukraine. The film director takes the viewer on a journey of discovery as he and several Ukrainian students absorb the testimony of local people who escaped brutal execution and those who rescued friends and neighbours during the Holocaust. A collection of men and women share the details of their experiences, and we are afforded a glimpse of modern day Ukraine: the ethnic stereotypes that continue to exist and the manner in which Post-Soviet society is dealing with the question of how to memorialize the sites where tens of thousands of Jewish families and others were executed and thrown into mass graves.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with Doris Bergen, Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor in Holocaust Studies, Frank Sysyn, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, and Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director.

Innis Townhall, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave
Sponsored by the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Thursday, March 12, 1-2 pm
Anna Wylegala (Jacyk Visiting Scholar, Graduate School for Social Research, Warsaw, Poland), “Displaced people, displaced memory? Local historical identity in Ukrainian Galicia and Polish ‘Regained Lands’”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6211
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday, March 12, 6 - 8 pm
Marko Bojcun
(London Metropolitan University, Department of Law, Governance
and International Relations), On the Brink of Default? Ukraine, Europe, and the International Financial Crisis“
Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6848

Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1  Devonshire Place)

Sponsored by the Wolodymyr Dylynsky Memorial Fund at the Canadian  Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, in co-operation  with the CIUS Toronto Office, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and Institute of European Studies, University of Toronto.

The crisis currently gripping Ukraine’s banks has already permeated the broader economy, leading to cutbacks in production, rising unemployment, and a marked reduction in foreign trade. The political tensions arising from this crisis are evident in the dispute between Premier Tymoshenko and President Yushchenko over a way out of it. The European Union figures prominently in the current situation insofar as it is Ukraine’s single-most important trading partner, and its member states’ banks are the biggest investors into Ukraine’s ailing financial sector. Whether the EU and institutions like the IMF, EBRD and EIB can help Ukraine out of its current predicament will affect its long-term attitudes towards east and west. Right now, Ukraine’s leaders are looking carefully at how the core EU member states are dealing with Hungary, Latvia, and other new EU member states that have been badly afflicted by the same crisis.

Wednesday, March 18, 12-2 pm
Marc-Antoine Eyl-Mazegga
,(Sciences-Po Paris), “The Russo-Ukrainian gas conflict: origins and consequences for Ukraine's stability, Ukraine-Russia relations and Ukraine-EU-Russia relations’”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7370
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Ukrainian People's Home in Toronto, the Institute of European Studies and CERES

Thursday, March 19, 2-4 pm
Bohdan Klid
(University of Alberta), “Historical Memory on WWII and UPA in
Ukrainian Rock and Hip-Hop Music”

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7382
Room 23, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, April 3, 5-7 pm
Screening of "A Kingdom Reborn: Treasures from Ukrainian Galicia"
, Canada (2007), 57 min (English)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7234
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Written by Peter Bejger, directed and produced by Dani Stodilka
Presented by Prof. Frank Sysyn (Canadian Institute for Ukrainian Studies)
For full synopsis and reviews: www.akingdomreborn.com

The documentary film brings to life one of the legendary cities and regions of Central Europe. Lviv is the capital city of the medieval principality Galicia, whose architecture and treasures offer an exquisite blending of the Byzantine and Latin aesthetic. Long subject to historic narratives imposed by foreign rulers, the Ukrainians of Galicia -- museum curators, historians and icon painters -- now tell their own history of Galicia through their artistic heritage.

The film will be followed by Q&A session moderated by Prof. Frank Sysyn

Tuesday, April 7, 3-5 pm
Anders Aslund
(The Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics), “How Ukraine Became a Market Economy and Democracy”
Chair: Oleh Havrylyshyn (University of Toronto)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7381
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Anders Åslund has been deeply engaged in Ukraine since 1985. He boldly predicted the fall of the Soviet communist system in his Gorbachev’s Struggle for Economic Reform (1989). He served as an economic adviser to the Ukrainian government from 1994 until 1997. He was one of the founders of the Kyiv School of Economics. In 2004 he cochaired a United Nations Blue Ribbon Commission for Ukraine, Proposals for the President: A New Wave of Reform. He is the author of nine books, including Russia’s Capitalist Revolution: Why Market Reform Succeeded and Democracy Failed (2007), which was named a Choice Outstanding Academic title for 2008, and How Capitalism Was Built: the Transformation of Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Central Asia (2007), which the Economist magazine named one of the best books of the year in 2007. He coedited Economic Reform in Ukraine: the Unfinished Agenda (2000) and Revolution in Orange (2006). Dr. Åslund joined the Peterson Institute for International Economics as senior fellow in 2006. He was the director of the Russian and Eurasian Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He was the founding director of the Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics and professor at the Stockholm School of Economics. He earned his doctorate from the University of Oxford.. Dr. Aslund will be discussing his forthcoming book How Ukraine Became a Market Economy and Democracy, to be published by the Peterson Institute in March 2009 http://bookstore.petersoninstitute.org/book-store/4273.html

Thursday, April 9, 12-2 pm
Olga Onuch
(PhD candidate, Oxford University), “Revolutionary Moments and Revolutionary Movements: Comparing the Role of The Two 'Poras' in The Ukrainian "Orange Revolution"(2004)”
Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Olga Onuch is a DPhil Candidate in Politics at Nuffield College at the University of Oxford. Ms. Onuch's current research focuses on a comparison of the role of social mobilisation in Eastern Europe and Latin America specifically focusing on two paired comparisons. The first  of crisis related mobilisation in Ukraine (2004) and Argentina (2001) and the second of labour based mobilisation in Poland and Brazil.

The paper to be presented focuses solely on the case of crisis related mobilisation in Ukraine in 2004 and traces the political roles of social movements leading up to and during the 'Orange Revolution'. The paper challenges current theoretical and empirical misconceptions regarding the 'Orange Revolution' by explicating the differing yet complimentary roles of the two PORA movements (Black and Yellow). The paper demonstrates that the two PORAs although influential where part of a broader network of social movements which was built over two decades and fused together during a critical moment of mass mobilisation now referred to as the "Orange Revolution".

The empirical findings are arrived at through process tracing, network and event history analysis methodologies based on two years worth of interviews, focus groups and archival and statistical research conducted in Kyiv, Lviv and Odessa, Ukraine.

Monday, April 27, 1-5 pm
Roundtable “Perspectives on Media and Communications in Ukraine”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=6749
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the SSHRC, Petro Jacyk Progam for the Study of Ukraine, University of Toronto, University of Western Ontario, National University of the Kyiv Mohyla Academy.

What role are mass media and communications playing in the larger political, economic and social changes occurring in the post communist world? This round table explores the question by focusing the lens on one country, Ukraine. It looks at both the media themselves as well as the larger context in which they operate. The issues will be examined from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and vantage points, including political science, communications studies, law, and the NGO sector. The round table will bring together an international group of both scholars and practitioners who conduct research and work in various aspects of media, journalism and communications in Ukraine.

Participants in the conference will include: Ruslan Deynychenko, School of Journalism, University of the Kyiv Mohyla Academy, Ukraine, Marta Dyczok, University of Western Ontario, Yevhen Fedchenko, Dean, School of Journalism , University of the Kyiv Mohyla Academy, Marta Kolomayets, National Democratic Institute, Washington, DC, Serhii Kvit, President, University of the Kyiv Mohyla Academy, Tammy Lynch, Boston University, Nataliya Petrova, Media Law Expert, Ukraine, Mykola Riabchuk, Ukrainian Centre for Cultural Studies.

Conference website: http://history.uwo.ca/events/PMCUkraineConference/index.html

Thursday, April 30, 6-8 pm
"My Journey": Book Launch of Peter Potichnyj's Memoirs

Registration: http://www.utoronto.ca/ceres/
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Peter J. Potichnyj is professor emeritus at McMaster University. He received MA & PhD in Government & Politics from Columbia University, New York, USA. He also obtained Diploma in Soviet Studies from the Russian Institute, Columbia University.
He is author, co-author and editor of some 18 books on Soviet, Ukrainian and East European issues and Editor-in-Chief of “The Litopys UPA”, an ongoing documentary series of which 66 volumes have appeared to date. In 1945-47, he served in the UPA and during the Korean War in the United States Marine Corps.
 
Book Title: My Journey, (Language: English).
Annotation: A short biographical memoir of Peter J. Potichnyj from his birth to the time when as a young man, soldier of the UPA, he arrived in West Germany at the end of 1947.

 

 

 



 

 


   
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