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Munk Centre
 

 

All events are free and open to the public, but registration is required.


EVENTS IN 2009-2010

Thursday, September 24, 11-1 pm
Contemporary Ukraine on the Cultural Map of Europe

Divided into three thematic parts--"Mapping the Nation: History, Politics, and Religion," "Reflecting Identities: The Literary Paradigm," and "Manifesting Culture: Language, Media, and the Arts"--and edited by Larissa M. L. Zaleska Onyshkevych and Maria Rewakowicz, the new book "Contemporary Ukraine on the Cultural Map of Europe" is a collection of 26 essays exploring various aspects of the relationship between Ukraine's contemporary culture and the general European cultural paradigm.
The participants Maria G. Rewakowicz (co-editor; Shevchenko Scientific Society, USA), Maxim Tarwawsky (University of Toronto), and Marko Robert Stech (Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies) will present papers based on their respective essays and dealing with various aspects of contemporary Ukrainian literature. 
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7956
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

 

Saturday, October 31, 1-5 pm
“Mykola Lysenko: a Symposium”
Olga Andriewsky (Trent University), "In Search of Mykola Lysenko: A Historian’s Exploration"

Taras Filenko (City Music Center, Duquesne University), “Mykola Lysenko: Founder of Ethnomusicology”
Dagmara Turchyn (independent scholar, Toronto), "Ukrainian and European Contexts in Lysenko's Art Songs"
Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7788
Room 330, Edward Johnson Building, Faculty of Music
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Art Song Project .

Monday, November 2, 12-2 pm
Kai Struve (Martin-Luther-Universität Hall),"Reprisal" and Excess: Violence against Jews in Eastern Galicia during Summer 1941”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7948
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for Jewish Studies.

The lecture will discuss the controversial issue of violence against Jews during the first weeks after the beginning of the German-Soviet war on 22 June 1941. It will differentiate between three closely interrelated contexts from which the violence originated, i.e. acitivities of the German police and armed forces, of the Ukrainian nationalists of the OUN and local militias, and spontaneous acts of violence, destruction and robbery from the local population. The lecture will start with an analysis of events in Lviv and will discuss the case of Lviv in the context of the general phenomena of anti-Jewish violence in Western Ukraine and beyond in this period.

Tuesday, November 3, 12-2 pm
Vladyslav Hrynevych
(Senior Research Associate, Kuras Institute of Political and Ethnic Studies of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), “The Second World War in the Official Politics of Memory and Political Disputes of Present-Day Ukraine”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8267
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Monday, November 9, 12-3 pm
Workshop “Judicial Reform and Politics in Post-Soviet Ukraine”
Presenters: Peter Solomon (University of Toronto),
Myroslava Bilak (Associate Professor of Constitutional Law at the International Solomon University in Kyiv; Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar), "Judicial Reform in Ukraine: Political Will or Political Ill?"
Serhiy Kudelia (Kyiv-Mohyla Academy,Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow), "Partisan Justice:
The Use and Abuse of Courts in Settling Ukraine's Power Struggles"

Alexei Trochev (Law & Society Fellow, Maurer School of Law, Indiana University)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7798
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Tuesday, November 10, 10am -12 pm
Marko Pavlyshyn
(Monash University, Australia), “Writing in Ukraine and European Identity Before 1798”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8349
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Marko Pavlyshyn is Head of the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, and convenor of Ukrainian Studies in Monash University's School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics. Marko Pavlyshyn is the author of Kobylianska: Interpretations (Kharkiv, 2008), Canon and Iconostasis (Kyiv, 1997), and more than 70 chapters in books and articles in scholarly journals, including Slavic Review, Slavonic and East European Review, Slavic and East European Journal, Suchasnist', Journal of Ukrainian Studies, Harvard Ukrainian Studies, and Australian Slavonic and East European Studies.
In 2000-2005 Marko Pavlyshyn was the Director of Monash University’s Centre for European Studies. He was the founding President of the Ukrainian Studies Association of Australia and is a member of the Bureau of the International Association for Ukrainian Studies. In 1998-2003 he was President of the Australia and New Zealand Slavists' Association. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.

Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 6 - 8 pm
Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture
Andrea Graziosi (University of Naples, Italy)"The Holodomor and the Soviet Famines, 1931-33". Summary: text. Audiorecording is available at: http://www.utoronto.ca/jacyk/audio/graziosi_famine.mp3
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7358
Combination Room, Trinity College (6 Hoskin Avenue)
Co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch, the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

The lecture will discuss the relations between the pan-Soviet 1931–1933 famines, and special phenomena such as the Kazakhstan famine-cum-epidemics of 1931–1933 and the Ukrainian-Kuban Holodomor of late 1932 to early 1933. On the one hand, it will analyze their common causes and their common background; on the other, it will focus on the specific traits of these major tragedies, addressing their relations with Stalin's decisions and policies in Moscow as well as with local conditions. A discussion of the genocide issue, and of recent controversies, will be followed by some thoughts on the Holodomor's consequences for Ukraine.

Andrea Graziosi is Professor of History at the University of Naples "Federico II" and President (2007-2011) of the Italian Society for the Study of Contemporary History (www.sissco.it). He is the author, among other things, of "Lettere da Kharkov" (Torino, Einaudi, 1991 and Kharkiv, 2007), "The Great Soviet Peasant War" (Cambridge, MA, 1996 and Moscow, 2001), "Bol’ševiki i krest’iane na Ukraine, 1918-1919" (Moscow, AIRO-XX, 1997), "A New, Peculiar State. Explorations in Soviet History" (Westport, CT, 2000), "Guerra e rivoluzione in Europa 1905-1956" (Bologna, 2002, Kyiv and Moscow, 2005), "L’Urss di Lenin e Stalin, 1914-1945" (Bologna, 2007) and "L’Urss dal trionfo al degrado, 1945-1991" (Bologna, Il Mulino, 2008). He serves in Editorial Boards of a number of French, English, Italian, Ukrainian and U.S. specialized journals, co-edits in Moscow, since 1992, the series "Dokumenty sovetskoi istorii" (15 volumes in print) and is a member of the editorial board of the series Istoriia Stalinizma (Rosspen, Moscow).

Friday, November 20, 5:30-7:30 pm
Panel Discussion: "Ukraine's Electoral Battle: Will 2010 Presidential Election Change the  Nation's Course?"
Participants: Serhiy Kudelia (Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar), Lucan Way (University of Toronto), Marta Dyczok (University of Western Ontario). Chair: Peter Solomon (University of Toronto).
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7707
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday, November 26, 11 am-1pm
Oksana Zabuzhko
, “Being a Writer in Contemporary Ukraine: The Choice Between Command and Freedom”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7980
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Oksana Zabuzhko, Ukraine’s leading contemporary poet, writer and essayist, was born in 1960. She graduated from the department of philosophy of Kyiv Shevchenko University in1982, and obtained her PhD in philosophy of arts in 1987. She has worked as a Research Associate for the Institute of Philosophy of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, lectured in the US on Ukrainian culture (at Penn State University, 1992, Harvard University, and University of Pittsburgh, 1994), and worked as a columnist for some of the Ukraine's major journals. After the publication of her novel Field Work in Ukrainian Sex (1996), later named “the most influential Ukrainian book for the 15 years of independence”, she has been living as a free-lance author. She is Vice-President of the Ukrainian PEN. Ms.Zabuzhko lives in Kyiv.

Thursday, November 26, 7-10 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

True to tradition, the series will present a Canadian premier of the feature documentary The Fourth Wave, 2008, director Victoria Melnykova. The Kyiv-born Victoria Melnykova, is a graduate of the Ivan Karpenko-Kary University for Film, Theater, and Television. She is a recognized filmmaker in her own country and well-known to and liked by the Club’s audiences in the USA and Canada who saw her earlier films “Consonance” and “With Best Wishes, Enver”. Her new film discusses the massive emigration from Ukraine in the last decade. It is a masterfully done narrative. Come and see for yourself. You are bound to like it.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion on the post-Soviet emigration to the West with Natalka Patsyurko (Concordia University) and Yuri Shevchuk (Director, Ukrainian Film Club). The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.
Innis Townhall, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program, Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Friday, November 27, 5-7pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

Canadian premiere Holodomor: Technology of Genocide

In commemoration of the Holodomor, the series will be screening the  documentary  Holodomor: Technology of Genocide. Produced by the  National Television Company of Ukraine, the film  is a detailed step- by-step factual account of how the  mass famine of 1932-1933 in  Ukraine, the Holodomor, was conceived, executed, covered up; who its  masterminds, perpetrators, and apologists were.  Rich with historical documentary information and some  riveting eye-witness accounts of the survivors, the film provides  a  Ukrainian interpretation of  tragic events of 1932-33.

The screening will be followed by Q &A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director. The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program, Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

 

Monday, January 11, 6-8 pm
Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern
(Northwestern University), "Between Nationalism and Communism: Adventures of Ivan Kulyk in Canada and Ukraine"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8058
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place) Sponsored by the the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for Jewish Studies

A harbinger of Ukrainian revivalism, Kulyk was a steadfast Bolshevik. Born in Uman, Ukraine, he worked in Pennsylvania coal mines, edited a Marxist newspaper in New York, organized literary groups in the post-revolutionary Ukraine, taught Ukrainian culture in Montreal, and enriched Ukrainian poetry with the rhythms of jazz and samba. Explore how a shtetl-born Jew made himself into a Ukrainian Bolshevik and how he failed reconcile his class and national minority values.

Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern teaches Early Modern, Modern, and East European Jewish history and culture, Jewish Mysticism and Kabbalah, and Slavic-Jewish Literatures  at Northwestern University where he also serves as the Director of the Crown Family Center of Jewish Studies. He published more than a hundred articles in history and comparative literature and authored three books, "Jews in the Russian Army, 1827-1917: Drafted into Modernity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), "The Anti-Imperial Choice: the Making of the Ukrainian Jew" (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009), and "Lenin's Jewish Question" (forthcoming with Yale University Press, Spring, 2010). At present he is working on a book "Shtetl as it Was, 1790-1830" reconstructing and contextualizing the material culture of an East European trading town.

 

Thursday, January 21, 5 pm
International Graduate Student Symposium “New Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine: Politics, History and Culture”.
Opening remarks by Jeffrey Kopstein (Director, CERES) and Mark Strychar-Bodnar (Student Committee, CERES)
Welcoming remarks: Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Member of Parliament)           
Keynote address by Frank Sysyn (Director of the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta), “The Transformation of Ukrainian Studies Since Ukrainian Independence”

Conference website: http://www.utoronto.ca/jacyk/gss2010/index.html
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7553
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Member of Parliament for Etobicoke Center) and his family's charitable The Dopomoha Ukraini Foundation, Buduchnist Credit Union Foundation, and Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies.

January 22, 9am -5:30 pm
International Graduate Student Symposium “New Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine: Politics, History and Culture”

9 am-12 pm     Panel: NEW POLICY PERSPECTIVES
Chair: Serhiy Kudelia (Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow)
Presenter: Bridget Goodman (University of Pennsylvania), “Higher Education in Ukraine: European Cooperation at What Political and Linguistic Cost”
Discussant:Valentyna Kushnarenko (OISE, University of Toronto)/Jessica Denenberg (DAAD Information Centre, Toronto)
Presenter 2: Khrystyna Pavlyk(Lviv National University), “Entrepreneurship And Economic Growth: Policy Implications Based On The Ukraine’s Region Experience”
Discussant: Oleh Havrylyshyn (University of Toronto)
Presenter 3: Tamara Martsenyuk(Kyiv Mohyla Academy), “Gender Quotas in Ukraine: To Be or Not To Be”
Discussant: Natalka Patsiurko (Concordia University)

12-1 pm           Lunch

1-3 pm             Panel: HISTORY AND POLITICS OF MEMORY I  
Chair: Robert Magocsi (University of Toronto)
Presenter 1: Mihaly Kalman (Harvard University), “Ethnic mobilization, interethnic competition, and counterinsurgent paramilitary units: Jewish self-defense in Ukraine during the Civil War”
Discussant: Jeffrey Kopstein (University of Toronto)
Presenter 2: Huseyin Oylupinar (University of Alberta), “The Making of the Collective Memory in Contemporary Ukraine: The Hetman's Capital "Baturyn"”
Discussant: Frank Sysyn (CIUS, University of Alberta)

3-3:30              Coffee Break

3:30-5:30 pm              Panel: GEOPOLITICAL ISSUES
Chair: Peter Solomon (University of Toronto)
Presenter 1: Eduard Baidaus (University of Alberta), “Moldova, the Transnistrian Conflict and the Ukrainian Politics: Some Considerations, 1992-2009”
Discussant: Lucan Way (University of Toronto)
Presenter 2: Brandon Rice (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “The Paradox of Pipelines: A Theory-Generating Case Study of Ukraine”
Discussant: Serhiy Kudelia (Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow)
Conference website: http://www.utoronto.ca/jacyk/gss2010/index.html
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7553
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Member of Parliament for Etobicoke Center) and his family's charitable The Dopomoha Ukraini Foundation, Buduchnist Credit Union Foundation, and Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies.

January 23, 11 am -5:00 pm
International Graduate Student Symposium “New Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine: Politics, History and Culture”

11:15 am-1:15 pm      Panel: HISTORY AND POLITICS OF MEMORY II

Chair: Serhiy Bilenky (University of Toronto)
Presenter 1: Khrystyna Chushak (Monash University), “Erasing from collective memory: the case of Iaroslav Halan and his museum”
Discussant: Olga Andriewsky (Trent University)
Presenter 2: Lina Klymenko (University of Vienna), “Memory, Political Culture, and Democratization in Post-Soviet Ukraine, Russia, and Belarus”
Discussant: David Marples (University of Alberta)

1:15-2 pm        Lunch

2-4 pm Panel: ISSUES IN MEDIA

Chair:. Lucan Way (University of Toronto)
Presenter 1: Anastasia Grynko (Kyiv Mohyla Academy), “Media Practice and Responsible Journalism in Ukraine: Developing an Interpretive Approach to Media Transparency Research”
Discussant: Marta Dyczok, (University of Western Ontario)
Presenter 2: Valentyna Dymytrova (Université Lumière Lyon 2), “Digital strategies of Ukrainian political identities: the 2010 presidential campaign”
Discussant: Serhiy Kudelia (Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow)

4:00-4:15 pm  Coffee Break

4:15-5:00 pm Roundtable Closing Discussion
Chair: Marta Dyczok (University of Western Ontario)

Conference website: http://www.utoronto.ca/jacyk/gss2010/index.html
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=7553
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Member of Parliament for Etobicoke Center) and his family's charitable The Dopomoha Ukraini Foundation, Buduchnist Credit Union Foundation, and Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies.

Thursday, February 11, 7-10 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

Screening and panel discussion of TARAS BULBA, 2009, director Vladimir Bortko, Russian Federation. Vladimir Bortko made this film inspired by the famous Nikolai Gogol story about love, betrayal, and revenge. Released in Ukraine last April and widely distributed there, this film provoked a small storm among the Ukrainian public by its unapologetic neo-colonialist politics and ideology. It is an interesting document of post-Soviet Russian revanchism made fascinating by an enthusiastic participation of Ukrainian talent in the project, including the actors Bohdan Stupka, Ada Rohovtseva, Les Serdiuk, the artist Serhiy Yakutovych, to name but a few. Notes Russian reviewer Roman Volobuev, “Bortko, known for his pedantic treatment of literary texts, in this case, chopped Gogol up into a salad and made use of only those its pieces that will insult the greatest number of inhabitants of sovereign Ukraine.” Insult or not, but the film reveals quite a lot about present-day Russia and Ukraine.

Panel: Taras Koznarsky (Department of Slavic Literatures and Languages, UofT), Leo Livak (Department of Slavic Literatures and Languages, UofT), Piotr Wrobel (Chair of Polish History, UofT) and Yuri Shevchuk (Columbia University), will discuss the film after the screening.

The film is in its original Russian language version with English subtitles. Free and open to the public.
Innis Townhall, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies the Petro Jacyk Program, Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.


Friday, February 12, 6-8pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

The series will screen and discuss the new feature narrative film “Birds of Paradise” 2008, by Roman Balayan. Born in Nagorny Karabakh and educated in Kyiv, Balayan considers himself a student of legendary Serhiy Paradzhanov. However unlike his teacher, Balayan has avoided references to Ukraine in his films and used it instead as a geographical location rather than a cultural destination in his stories. His films represent an influential trend in the culture of a post-Soviet Ukraine deeply rooted in the imperial Russian mentality which denies Ukrainians a voice of their own. “Birds of Paradise” is about a Soviet writer in Kyiv in the early 1980s who challenges the regime in his quest for personal freedom. People can openly voice their thoughts only in private kitchens behind curtained windows. The KGB tapped phones, surveyed the ‘unreliable’ and consistently destroyed all forms of decent. The protagonists challenge the inhumane regime, risk their lives and prove that nobody can stop a person striving for freedom. Roman Balayan explains, “It is important for me to make a picture that confronts and pushes the viewer to face their own feelings and thoughts. It is important that even the most thick-skinned person feel what it means to have no freedom … so that the times when people could not speak the truth stay for ever in the past.” The film is one of the last roles played by celebrated Russianactor Oleg Yankovsky.

The screening will be followed by Q &A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director. The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program, Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Wednesday, February 24, 6-8 pm
Roundtable “Ukraine's Presidential Elections: Analysis of the Results”. Chair: Lucan Way (University of Toronto). Participants: Oleh Havrylyshyn (University of Toronto), Jakob Hedeskog (Swedish Defence Research Agency), Serhiy Kudelia (Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow), David Marples (University of Alberta)
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8239
Sponsored: by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, February 26, 2-4 pm (Event was canceled)
Serhii Plokhii (Harvard University), “Yalta: The Price of Peace”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8692
Room 208, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Serhii Plokhii (Plokhy) is Mykhailo Hrushevsky professor of Ukrainian history at Harvard University and the author of several award-winning books on Ukrainian and Russian history, including The Cossacks and Religion in Early Modern Ukraine (Oxford, 2001), The Origins of the Slavic Nations: Premodern Identities in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus (Cambridge, 2006), and Ukraine and Russia: Representations of the Past (Toronto, 2008). His revisionist account of the 1945 Yalta conference, Yalta: The Price of Peace was released by Viking Press on 4 February 2010, to mark the 65-th anniversary of the start of the Yalta Conference.

YALTA tells the story of the eight extraordinary days when the fate of the world was decided by three of the towering figures of the twentieth century, each a legend who transformed his country. The Big Three used every tool in their arsenal, as they all came to the conference with something to lose. Alliances shifted as they partitioned Germany, approved the most aggressive aerial bombing campaign in history, redrew the borders of Eastern Europe and created a new organization to settle future disputes. Two months later, Stalin was strengthening his grip on Eastern Europe, Roosevelt was dead and Churchill on the cusp of a humiliating electoral defeat.

Monday, March 1, 12-2 pm
Michael Moser (Associate professor of linguistics at the Institute of Slavic Studies, University of Vienna), “At the Linguistic Front: The Stalinist War against the Ukrainian Language”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8144
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Monday, March 15, 5-7 pm.
The Wolodymyr Dylynsky Memorial Lecture
Oksana Kis
( Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology (Lviv), National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), " "Major developments in women's history scholarship in Ukraine since 1991"
Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8582
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Wolodymyr Dylynsky Fund at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (University of Alberta), the CIUS Toronto Office (University of Toronto), and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Wednesday, March 31, 12-1:30 pm
Jakob Hedenskog
(Petro Jacyk Visiting Fellow, Deputy Research Director, Swedish Defence Research Agency), “Security Interests in the Black Sea Region”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8719
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday, April 8, 10 am-4 pm
“The New Agenda of Russian-Ukrainian Relations in the Global Context”


10 am -12 pm Panel I: The New Agenda of Russian-Ukrainian Relations? Views from Moscow and Kyiv

Chair: Peter Solomon (University of Toronto)
Panellists: Serhiy Kudelia(Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy), Sergei Plekhanov ( York University), Oleh Havrylyshyn ( University of Toronto)

12-1:30 pm Working Luncheon with Andrey Veklenko, Consul General of the Russian Federation (invited), and Oleksandr Danyleiko, Consul General of Ukraine (confirmed)

1:30-4 pm Panel II: The US and EU Interests in Russian-Ukrainian Relations
Chair: Jeffrey Kopstein (University of Toronto)
Panellists: David J. Kramer (The German Marshall Fund of the United States), Jakob Hedenskog (Swedish Defence Research Agency), Nikolai Zlobin (World Security Institute)
Registration::http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8380
Sponsored: by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Monday, April 12 , 5-7 pm
David Marples
(University of Alberta), “Causes and Consequences of Holodomor: Famines in Ukraine in 1932-33”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8670
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored: by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

David R. Marples is Distinguished University Professor, Department of History & Classics, University of Alberta. He is author of thirteen single-authored books and two edited books on topics ranging from 20th Century Russia, Stalinism, contemporary Belarus, contemporary Ukraine, and the Chernobyl disaster. His most recent book is entitled Heroes and Villains: Creating National History in Contemporary Ukraine (Budapest: Central European University Press, 2008). At the University of Alberta, he received a McCalla Professorship in 1998, the Faculty of Arts Prize for Full Professors in 1999, the J. Gordin Kaplan Award for Excellence in Research in 2003, a Killam Annual Professorship in 2005-06, and the University Cup, the university’s highest honour, in 2008. He is the current holder of a major award from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) for the topic “History, Memory, and World War II in Belarus.”

Monday, April 19, 12-2 pm
Workshop “Internationalization of Higher Education in Ukraine: In a Search of Effective Partnership Paradigm”
Participants: Li Bennich-Bjokman (Uppsala University, Sweden) and Sergiy Kurbatov (The Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of Ukraine)
Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8512
Room 108, North Building, Munk Centre for International Studies (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, The Office of Teaching Support at the Ontario Institute for Studies in education/OISE, University of Toronto (OTSO) and the Interregional Ukrainian Graduate Student Association of University of Toronto and York University.

International academic collaboration prepares educational systems to act effectively in foreign environments and provides global society with educational models that can respond efficiently to current challenges and demands of globalization. The purpose of this workshop is to examine the nature and role of Swedish-Ukrainian university collaborative activities. The workshop explores the experiences and perspectives of the joint Swedish-Ukrainian internationalization policy development project on the nature and role of international academic joint ventures. The analysis will highlight the specifics of institutional culture and dynamics of joint project management.



 

 


   
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