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All events are free and open to the public, but registration is required.


EVENTS IN 2010-2011

Monday, October 4, 5 -7 pm
Seminar on Paul Robert Magocsi’s second revised and expanded edition of “A History of Ukraine: The Land and Its Peoples”

Chair: Professor Kenneth Mills, Department of History, University of Toronto

Participants: Doris Bergen (Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies), Victor Ostapchuk (Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto), Lucan Way (Department of Political Science, University of Toronto), Piotr Wrobel (Chair of Polish History, University of Toronto); Derek Penslar (Zacks Professor of Jewish History); Edward J. R. Jackman (Secretary General, Canadian Catholic Historical Association; Lubomyr Luciuk (Department of Politics and Economics, Royal Military College of Canada); Paul Robert Magocsi (Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto).

Sponsored by:
Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies
Chair of Polish History
Department of History
Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies

Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9211
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, Chair of Polish History, and Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies

Wednesday, October 6, 6:00 - 8:00 pm
Comparative Roundtable “Electoral Populism in Latin America and Eastern Europe.”

The Petro Jacyk Program at  CERES  in cooperation with the  Latin American Studies Program present a roundtable entitled: Electoral Populism in Latin America and Eastern Europe : Comparing "East” and “South".

Participants will present an analysis of the rising trend of Electoral Populism in Latin America and Eastern Europe and its negative effects on the development and consolidation of democratic practices in both regions.

In order to stimulate inter-regional dialogue, brief presentations will be made by experts from both regions, including:
Dr. Ana Maria Bejarano (University of Toronto)
Dr. Jacqueline Behrend (oxon, La Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Argentina)
Dr. Francisco Panizza (London School of Economics, UK)
Dr. Olga Onuch (oxon, University of Toronto)
Dr. Gilles Serra  (University of Oxford, UK and Mexico)
Prof. Laurence Whitehead (oxon, University of Oxford, UK)

Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9424
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

 

Friday, October 8, 2-4 pm
Serhiy Kvit (President, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy), “Prospects for Higher Education in Ukraine’s 2010 Post- Orange Revolution Realities”

Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9389
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Friday, October 22, 12-1:30 pm
Olena Petrenko
(Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar, Kolasky Fellow (CIUS), PhD candidate, Department of History, Ruhr University, Germany), “Between Heroizing and Defamation. Women in the Armed Ukrainian Underground, 1942-1954”

Beginning from the creation of sovereign Ukrainian state, the story of the armed underground within the period of 1930s-1950s in the West-Ukrainian territories has become a major political issue. The public debates on the role of the national resistance movement in modern Ukraine’s history ties in closely with the country’s heavily mythologized and politicized collective cultural memory. The paper focuses on Ukraine’s contemporary, and highly conflictive, memory landscape, paying attention to both the representatives of the Ukrainian underground movement and the politicization and mythicization of the movement’s history. Female destinies usually play a marginal role in both public commemorative culture and historical research, except as an illustration of female heroism and Ukrainian martyrdom. The representations of women’s lives are thus often frozen into predetermined patterns. In this context, women appear generally as icons and their lives as allegories of heroism rather than individual, multi-faceted experiences. To understand precisely those individual life stories and writing the collective biography of the female activists of the Ukrainian underground, it is necessary to analyze the reasons why women joined the ranks of armed resistance. In addition to their participation in a vast range of auxiliary functions (cooking, sowing, the preparation of provisions, care for the wounded, communications and others), Olena examines women’s role on the propaganda front and also armed activities—the one area that has absorbed the brunt of scholarly attention. Women did participate as soldiers, scouts, and members of the security apparatus of the UPA, without necessarily having clear job specifications.

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8836
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Monday, October 25, 2-4 pm
Yuri Scherbak, Former Ambassador of Ukraine to Canada (and to the United States), “Contemporary Ukraine: Dreams and Realities.”

Following its declaration of independence in 1991, Ukraine set forth on its development as a distinct sovereign state with democratic ideals. This project has been set back dramatically after the recent election of Viktor Yanukovych as president of Ukraine. He and his government have consolidated power rapidly and ruthlessly, moving the country towards semi-authoritarianism. At the same time they have shifted the country’s orientation strongly back toward the orbit of Russia. Dr. Shcherbak examines these dramatic new developments.

Speaker: Dr.Yuri Scherbak began his political career in 1987 after Chornobyl catastrophe when he became leader of Ukrainian Greens. Dr. Scherbak initiated and led the first parliamentary investigation of the Chornobyl accident and the nuclear catastrophes in Semipalatinsk and in the Urals. He founded and became the leader of the Ukrainian Green Movement (organization which united more than 200 Ukrainian NGOs) in 1988 (it became the Green Party in 1990). Dr. Scherbak later was Ukraine's Ambassador to Israel, the United States, Mexico, and Canada (March 2000 till May 2003). In 2004-2006 Dr. Scherbak worked as Adviser to the Chairman of the Verkhovna Rada (Parliament of Ukraine). An eyewitness to the 1986 Chornobyl nuclear disaster, Dr. Yuri Scherbak wrote the sensational expose documentary novel Chornobyl. The novel was published in English in 1989. As a writer, Yuri Scherbak is a well-known novelist who has authored 20 books of prose, plays, poetry, and essays and more than 200 publications and interviews on medical, ecological, political and historical issue. He was been awarded medals and prizes in literature, medicine, and for his work as a Ukrainian statesman.

Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9558
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and Canadian Institute for Ukrainian Studies

Monday, November 1, 2-4 pm
Iryna Sklokina
(Kharkiv University, Ukraine), “The Memory of World War II in Soviet Ukraine: Practical Uses of the Cult"

Soviet practices of the WWII memory are often perceived as a secular cult, similar to a religious one, as a substitute of the sublime in the atheistic society. However, this approach often ignores the aspects of daily practical uses of the WWII memory, its close connections to everyday realities, and individual rational aims. In the center of this speech there is an intertwining of the memories and commemorations of WWII with such trends in the late Soviet society as the rise of consumerism, including tourism and entertainment. WWII was not only “the holy war”, but a useful ideological argument in the struggle for living resources in society of the deficit. But still, did it question or harm the official narrative of this war? The speaker raises this and other questions in the hope of providing the food for further thought.

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9714
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Wednesday, November 3, 5-7 pm
Myroslav Shkandrij
(University of Manitoba), “Serhiy Zhadan's Red Elvis and Arabesques Theatre” Film screening.
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9160
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Monday, November 8, 3-4:30 pm
A meeting with G. Daniel Caron, Ambassador of Canada to Ukraine

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9752
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Monday, November 8, 5-7 pm
Oleh Wolowyna
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), "Center for Demographic and Socio-economic Research of Ukrainians in the United States: Sociological and Applied Research Findings"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9269
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

The talk will discuss the activities of Center for Demographic and Socio-economic Research of Ukrainians in the US at the Shevchenko Scientific Society in New York and its research on the demography and sociology of Ukrainians in the United States and Canada. An important element is an integrated data base constructed with census and survey data for the period between 1980 and 2006, which has been made available on the Center’s web site: http://inform-decisions.com/ukrstat

Tuesday, November 9, 7-9 pm
Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture
Oleh Wolowyna
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Omelan Rudnyckyj and Pavlo Shevchuk (Institute of Demography and Social Studies), “Demographic Assessment of the Holodomor Within the Context of the 1932-1933 Famine in the USSR”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9268
Combination Room, Trinity College (6 Hoskin Avenue)
Co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch, the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

For many years research on the demography of the Holodomor has been hampered by lack of adequate data to address key issues like the number of losses due to the Holodomor, and the relative impact of the 1932-1933 Famine in different areas of the former Soviet Union.  Using the most comprehensive set of data available to date and original documents not included in previous research, as well as sophisticated demographic methodologies, a team of demographers at the Institute of Demography and Social Research of the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences (including Omelian Rudnytsky, Pavlo Shevchuk, Natalia Levchuk, and the speaker, who will be talking on behalf of the entire group) has been working for the last year to provide more definite answers to these questions.

The research has been framed within the context of the former Soviet Union, and provides estimates of direct and indirect losses for all former Soviet Republics.  Besides providing a more definite and scientifically sound estimate of the number of Holodomor losses in Ukraine, this comprehensive approach allows one to compare the magnitude of losses in Ukraine with losses in Russia, Kazakhstan and other former Soviet republics.

Friday, November 19, 2-3:30 pm
Anastasia Prychynenko
(Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar, Ph D candidate, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine) “Mediated Politics: Ukrainian Context”

Throughout the 20 century the role of media in politics has continued to grow steadily.  Growing circulation of newspapers, emergence of radio and television made it possible to spread the news with previously unprecedented speed. New technologies opened new forms of cooperation between the politics and the media and strengthened not only the two-way interaction but also the two-way influence. As a result, in the modern world of politics voters are constantly covered by the influence of media: media coverage provides the lens through which political events are viewed and evaluated by the majority of the population. These new forms of interaction have changed the very concept of mass behavior, introduced and developed Gustave Le Bon and Gabriel Tarde. Now that the space between a couch and a TV is perfectly enough to create the effect of mass communication, you can talk about the phenomenon of mediated politics.
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8956
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Tuesday, November 23, 5-7 pm
Oksana Tovaryanska
(PhD candidate, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy), "Beyond the official narratives: life stories of the former soldiers of the 14-th Waffen SS Division Galicia”

Since its creation in 1943, the history of the Galicia Division and its wartime record has remained one the most politicized and controversial subjects in Ukrainian history during WWII. The Division’s soldiers are claimed as “collaborators-traitors,” “war criminals” or “ fighters for Ukrainian independence” by different historiographic traditions. This speech is focused on the role of the Division as viewed by its former soldiers. In particular, it will examine how the memory of the former soldiers is being (re)constructed by the veterans themselves through the prism of their collective memory formation and commemoration practices. Individual motivations for joining the Division are one of the most important research objectives in this area.

As well as referring to a number of theoretical works, the main sources for this research are interviews conducted with the former soldiers of the Galicia Division who are living now in Ukraine and Canada as part of my ongoing project “The Galicia Division through the Eyes of its Former Soldiers”. Published memoirs, materials of the Ukrainian state archives and of the Ukrainian-Canadian Documentation and Research Centre (Toronto, Canada) are used as well.

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9225
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, The Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

Wednesday, November 24, 2-4 pm
Rafal Leskiewicz (Deputy Head, Office for the Preservation and Dissemination of Archival Records, Institute of National Remembrance, Poland)
Marcin Majewski (Head, Archival Reserch and Source Editing Department, Office for the Preservation and Dissemination of Archival Records, Institute of National Remembrance, Poland)

"Archival Co-operation between the Polish Institute of National Remembrance and the Security Service of Ukraine on the History of the Holodomor."
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9735
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program and the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, and Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish Studies 

In 2008 the Polish Senate and Sejm passed declarations regarding the Famine of 1932–33 in Ukraine on the 75th anniversary of that event. That same year the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR) and the State Archives Branch of the Security Service of Ukraine (SSU) jointly published a collection of documents in Polish about the Holodomor (as part of a series “Poland and Ukraine in the 1930s–1940s: Unknown Documents from the Archives of the Secret Services”), which appeared the following year in English translation. The compilation was notable for its inclusion of materials from Polish diplomatic sources and intelligence officers, and many of the items included had never been previously published. This presentation will discuss the history of co-operation between the INR and SSU on archival projects as well as examine the collection Holodomor: The Great Famine in Ukraine, 1932–1933.

Thursday, November 25, 7-10 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

(Please click on the link for more information)

A selection of most recent works by a younger generation of Ukrainian filmmakers screened in Canada for the first time: The Bird Catcher, 2005, by Larysa Artiuhina, Images of Polissia, 2006,by Serhiy Marchenko, Obstacleand A Short Walk Foreverby Maksim Neafit Buinitski, Rakhiraby Marian Bushan, Flyingby Roman Synchuk, Wardrobeby Yelyzaveta Kliuzko.

The screening will be followed by Q&A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director. Discussants: Maxim Tarnawsky (Slavic Languages and Literatures, UofT), Marta Dyczok (Political Science and History, University of Western Ontario).
Innis Town Hall, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program, Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9288

Friday, November 26, 6-8 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

(Please click on the link for more information)

Film: PKP (Pilsudski Bought Petliura), 1926, by Heorhii Stabovy and Aksel Lundin. Silent. 67 minutes.

The screening will be followed by Q&A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director. Discussants: Marta Dyczok (Political Science and History, University of Western Ontario), Tanya Richardson (Anthropology, Wilfrid Laurier University), Lucan Way (Political Science, U of T), Olga Onuch (Political Science, Jacyk Postdoctoral Fellow in Ukrainian Studies, U of T).

Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program, Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9287

Friday, January 21, 12-1:30 pm
Tetyana Dzyadevych
(Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar,  Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine), "Narrating Wartime Subjectivity: Women’s Experience in World War II
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9223
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

...I wrote this book to show my readers what is like for an average human being to live through the Blitzkrieg...
Rulka Langer


Tetyana Dzyadevych will speak about women’s experience during World War II. Her analysis focuses on stories of ordinary women who did not participate in any military actions or resistant movements even if they sympathized with any of them. The subjects of this study are women who lived under occupation or in evacuation. 
 At the center of her research is the everyday life of women in wartime. Her focus will be comparative and cross-national.  The sources for her research are women’s personal narrations like diaries, memoirs, and oral interviews. Dr. Dzyadevych will discuss dominant patterns in women’s personal narrations during the War, aiming to look at both what and how women wrote at wartime. She will share results of her inquiry into wartime female subjectivity through the study of reflections of the women’s inner world in their personal narratives. What did they think about? What did they write? How did they feel during the war campaign?

Wednesday, January 26, 7:00pm-9:00pm
Public reading, presentation and discussion of Timothy Snyder's new book "Bloodlands:Europe between Hitler and Stalin"
Speaker: Timothy Snyder (Department of History, Yale University)
Wine and Cheese reception to follow
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9953
620 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, ON (St. Vladimir Institute)
Sponsored by Polish Cultural Institute (NYC), Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, Ukrainian Canadian Research & Documentation Centre, Ukrainian Jewish Encounter

Thursday, January 27, 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM (NOTE: this event was relocated)
Timothy Snyder (Department of History, Yale University), "Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9942
Room 100 A, first floor, Jackman Humanities Building (former Medical Arts Building), 170 St. George street at Bloor and St. George)
Sponsored by  Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, Ukrainian Canadian Research & Documentation Centre, Polish Cultural Institute, Ukrainian Jewish Encounter

Friday, February 4, 12-2 pm
Oxana Shevel
(Tufts University), “The politics of memory in a divided society: a comparison of post-Franco Spain and post-Soviet Ukraine”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9275
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Oxana Shevel is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Tufts University specializing in comparative politics. Her research and teaching focuses on the post-Communist Europe and issues such as nation- and state-building, the politics of citizenship and migration, and the influence of international institutions on democratization. She is currently finalizing a book manuscript, to be published by Cambridge University Press, that examines how the politics of national identity and strategies of the UNHCR shape refugee admission policies in the post-Communist region. Professor Shevel is also working on her second book-length project - a comparative study of the sources of citizenship policies in fifteen former Soviet republics. Her research has appeared in Comparative Politics, East European Politics and Societies, Political Science Quarterly, Nationality Papers, and in edited volumes. Prior to coming to Tufts, Prof. Shevel taught at Purdue University and held post-doctoral appointments at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies and at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. She holds a PhD in Government from Harvard University, an M.Phil in International Relations from the University of Cambridge in England, and a BA in English and French from Kyiv State University in Ukraine.

Friday, February 18, 10-11:30 am (NOTE: this event was rescheduled and relocated)
Roman Kalytchak
(Associate Professor, Lviv Ivan Franko National University), “Regional Governance Reform in Ukraine: Strengthening or Undermining the National Sovereignty
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9226
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Recently, the re-centralization of power in all spheres has been justified by the necessity to re-establish stability in Ukraine. Despite its rhetoric, the ruling Region’s Party has opted to postpone the empowerment of regional self-government in order to rapidly introduce indispensable large-scale reforms. Therefore, the region remains a merely de-concentrated unit of central government and the regional governance reform is suspended again. In this context, this talk will discuss various challenges and concerns related to the institutional framework at the regional level in Ukraine.

Wednesday, March 2, 2-4 pm
Kyrylo Halushko
(Drahomanov Pedagogical University, Kyiv), “Історична політика" України і Росії 2005-2010: напрями, інституції, реалізація." (Note: the lecture will be in Ukrainian).

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=10096
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

This presentation will provide an analysis and compare Ukrainian and Russian state policies and ideologies regarding history from 2005 to 2010. Its focal point will be the official interpretation of Ukrainian-Russian relations in the past within the context of broader politico-ideological trends. It will first examine a consistent, long-established and wide-ranging Russian “industry” of official declarations; powerful media influences; textbook production; a strong and specialized network of scholarly institutions and think tanks; and mass-market book publishing and film making. The counterpoint to this is the unsuccessful attempt at a mass reconfiguration of Ukrainian attitudes toward their own history attempted during Viktor Yushchenko’s term in office, and the fundamental shift in interpreting the past that began in 2010 in the wake of Viktor Yanukovych’s election. The speaker, an active participant in community initiatives as well as plans by scholars, a publicist and critic, will attempt to assess the systemic failures of 2005–2009 and the likely prospects of the tendencies that came to the fore in 2010.
 

Thursday, March 3, 7-10 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

Film: Assholes. Arabesques, 2010.

The screening will be followed by Q&A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director.
Innis Town Hall, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9987

Friday, March 4,  2-4 pm
Sergei Zhuk (Ball State University), “Rock and Roll in the Rocket City: The West, Identity, and Ideology in Soviet Dnipropetrovsk, 1960–1985”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9460
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

How did rock music and other products of Western culture come to pervade youth culture in Brezhnev—era Dnipropetrovsk, a Ukrainian city essentially closed to outsiders and heavily policed by the KGB? In Rock and Roll in the Rocket City, Sergei I. Zhuk assesses the impact of Westernization on the city's youth, examining the degree to which the consumption of Western music, movies, and literature ultimately challenged the ideological control maintained by state officials. One among many of his stories is how the rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar led Dnipropetrovsk's young people to embrace not just one, but two Soviet taboos: rock music and Christianity. This book is the first historical study -- in any language -- of the everyday lives of Soviet urban youth during the Brezhnev era. A longtime student and resident of Dnipropetrovsk, Zhuk began research for this project in the 1990s. Weaving together diaries, interviews, oral histories, and KGB and party archival documents, he provides a vivid account of how Soviet cultural repression and unrest during the Brezhnev period laid the groundwork for a resurgent Ukrainian nationalism in the 1980s. In so doing, he demonstrates the influence of Western cultural consumption on the formation of a post—Soviet national identity.

Friday, March 4, 6-8 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

Film: White Bird with a Black Mark, 1970

The screening will be followed by Q&A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director.

Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles.

Registration:http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9986

Friday, March 25, 12-2 pm
Charles King (Professor of International Affairs and Government, Georgetown University), "The End of Jewish Odessa"
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9897
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for Jewish Studies.

Sunday, March 27,  3 pm (External event)
Publication launch of a new volume in the series Mykhailo Hrushevsky, History of Ukraine-Rus' (vol. 9, bk. 2, pt. 2), and tribute to its sponsor, Dr. Maria Fischer-Slysh

No registration required
The KUMF Gallery of the Canadian Ukrainian Art Foundation, 2118-A Bloor Street West, 2nd floor (between the High Park and Runnymede subway stops)
Sponsored by by the Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto; cosponsored by the Shevchenko Scientific Society

Tuesday, April 19, 2-4 pm
David Marples (University of Alberta), "Chernobyl (Chornobyl) 25 Years On: A Reanalysis of a Ukrainian Tragedy"

Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=10385
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies.

The talk will focus on the consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident in April 1986 and the current situation around the station and its surrounding areas. It will discuss initial and subsequent victims and health consequences, environmental impact, and the current state of the roof over the destroyed reactor. It will also comment on the impact on the nuclear industry in the former Soviet republics, as well as its current plans and new reactors. The talk is based on recent information from a wide variety of sources in Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia, and the archives of the former Ukrainian KGB.


David R. Marples is Distinguished University Professor in the Department of History & Classics and Director of the Stasiuk Program on Contemporary Ukraine, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta. He is author of thirteen books, including three on Chernobyl, and over 150 scholarly articles. He has been a consultant on the aftermath of the disaster for the governments of Canada and the United States, and has visited the plant and contaminated areas of Ukraine and Belarus. At the University of Alberta he has been the recipient of the university's research prize--the J. Gordin Kaplan Award for Excellence in Research--in 2003 and its highest award, the University Cup, in 2008.

Friday, April 29, 9:30 am-4:30 pm
A Symposium and Celebration Marking the 30th Anniversary of the Chair of Ukrainian Studies and the 120th Anniversary of Ukrainian Settlement "Conversations on Ukrainian Canadian Literature"

Registration not required. Free and open to public
Faculty Club, University of Toronto (41 Willcocks Street)
Sponsored by the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

Download Symposium Program here

Saturday, April 30, 10 am - 12 noon
"Yanukovych’s Ukraine": A Conversation With Adrian  Karatnycky, Taras Kuzio, and Alexander Motyl

Registration not required. Free and open to public
Faculty Club, University of Toronto (41 Willcocks Street)
Sponsored by the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

Saturday, May 7, 8 am - 17 pm
"Chornobyl 25 - Lessons For the Future" 25th Anniversary Chornobyl Symposium
Keynote Speakers: David Marples (History), Maureen Hatch (Epidemiology), Charles Ferguson (Nuclear Engineering)
Registration: http://guest.cvent.com/d/qdqyfb
Daniels Hollywood Theatre, Hospital For Sick Children, 555 University Ave, Toronto
Sponsored by University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine Chornobyl Project, Children of Chornobyl Canadian Fund, Shevchenko Scientific Society of Canada, Ukrainian Medical Association of North America -Toronto Branch, World Federation of Ukrainian Medical Associations – CITKA LIKAPIB

Download Symposium Program here

Thursday, May 26, 5-7 pm
Olga Onuch (Petro Jacyk Postdoctoral Fellow 2010-11, CERES, University of Toronto), Revolutionary Moments and Movements in Ukraine: the Making of the "Orange Revolution" and the Making of a “Civil Society.”
Registration: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=10458
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Situations where seemingly "out of nowhere you have revolution" confuse our analyses. Moments of mass-mobilization such as the Ukrainian “Orange Revolution” may not have been expected by outsiders but did not come out of “nowhere.” Olga Onuch argues that we need to dispel the notion that Ukraine "suffers" from a non-existing civil society and alack of social/civic activism. Dr. Onuch will discuss the contemporary history of social mobilization in Ukraine and its connection to the process behind the making of the moment of mass-mobilization also known as “Orange Revolution.” She will finish off with a brief explanation of why “ordinary” people joined the mass-protest in 2004 and why it can happen again.

 

 


   
Content: © 2002 Petro Jacyk • Design: © 2002 dragandesign.