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All events are free and open to the public, but registration is required.


EVENTS IN 2012-2013

Friday, October 5, 11-12 pm CANCELLED (due to visa delay)
Serhiy Kudelia
(Assistant Professor of Political Science at Baylor University), "Ukraine's Return to Autocracy: How Lasting Can It Be?"

In the first two years of his presidency Viktor Yanukovych put Ukraine back on an authoritarian path. He eliminated checks on his power, jailed opposition leaders, restrained civil society and engaged in unbridled corruption favoring his close circle. The parliamentary election in October 2012 may become a watershed event of his rule setting the stage for a decisive battle over the presidency in 2015. The talk will discuss power balance on the eve of the election, the likelihood of fraud and post-election protests and a potential impact of election results on Ukraine's political trajectory.

Dr. Kudelia was Petro Jacyk post-doctoral fellow at the University of Toronto in 2009-10. He also held teaching and research position at Johns Hopkins University, George Washington University and Kyiv-Mohyla Academy (Ukraine). His articles deal with the issues of state building, state-society relations and democratization in post-Soviet space.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

 

Tuesday, October 16, 2-4 pm
Vitalii Ogienko
(John Kolasky Visiting Scholar at the Petro Jacyk Program, Institute of National Memory, Ukraine), "Post-Genocide Ukraine? Analysing the Holodomor Collective Trauma"

Throughout the 20th century, Ukraine survived many catastrophic crises, some of them accompanied by enormous numbers of deaths and human suffering of outstaying proportions. The Holodomor of 1932-1933 is one of such events. Their immediate psychological impact and their later representations influenced social life in Ukraine for several generations to come. Can we speak about Post-Genocide Ukraine in this respect and what does it mean? This question will be at the core of Vitalii Ogienko's presentation.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Wednesday, October 17, 1-3 pm
Ruslan Zabily
(General Director of the Lonskyi [Lacki] Street Prison Museum in Lviv), "The Current State of Archives, Museums and Academic Freedom in Ukraine" (in Ukrainian)

A notable aspect of Ukraine’s democratization efforts after 1991 was the effort to come to grips with its experience as part of the Soviet Union. Mr. Zabily argues that the present Ukrainian regime has seemingly divested itself of any critical thinking regarding the Soviet past at the same time that it has been backsliding on the development of an open society. Mr. Zabily will speak on access to archival materials of the Soviet era, the prospects for historical research on the USSR and Ukrainian independence efforts (as well as the politics of national memory) and attempts to harass the academic community in Ukraine.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, November 8, 1:00-4:30 pm
Roundtable "Heritage: The Study and Practice of Ours and Theirs"

Heritage. Homeland. Diaspora. The analytic tools of transnational and migration studies may help us understand these terms, but the question remains: How do we define what is ours, and what is theirs? This roundtable will address questions of heritage in the context of post-Soviet Eastern Europe. The massive violence of the 20th century resulted in demographic changes creating far-flung diaspora communities preserving and contesting the heritage from home. Who has the authority to define heritage? How do diaspora groups function within larger post-Soviet communities? How does heritage intersect with history? What are the political and social challenges of creating and contesting heritage in practice?
Participating in the roundtable will be scholars and practitioners of heritage: Dr. Sofia Dyak, Academic Director of the Center for Urban History (Ukraine) speaking on "competing" diasporas in Lviv; Alti Rodal, Co-Director of the Ukrainian Jewish Encounter Initiative (Ottawa), on the challenges of heritage in practice with multiple communities; Dr. Adriana Helbig, University of Pittsburgh, on transnational exchange creating a new "heritage" in Ukraine; and Gabriela Kasprzak, University of Toronto, on nationalism and religion in Canadian Polonia. Following the presentations we will have questions by discussant Dr. Mayhill Fowler, Petro Jacyk Postdoctoral Fellow, and then open the floor to the audience.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Co-sponsored by the Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History, Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Jewish-Ukainian Encounter, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, November 9, 3:00-4:00 pm
Adriana Helbig
(Assistant Professor of Music, University of Pittsburgh), Spirituals, Jazz, and Hip-hop: Musical Mediations of Blackness in the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Russia and Ukraine." The talk will be followed by a discussion in the Buzek Lounge (102N) from 4-5pm.

"Africa" has figured strongly in the Russian imagination, going back to the gift of Hannibal to Tsar Peter the Great, the alternate erasure and lauding of Pushkin's blackness, the portrayals of Africa in Soviet cartoons, and the role that Africa plays vis-a-vis post-Soviet notions of class and race today. Musically, racial imaginings have been more closely tied with African Americans, a mediated sense of blackness imposed on all with dark skin. Musicians such as Paul Robeson were instrumental in shaping Soviet ideas about pan-African identity, reinforced through circulations of jazz during the Cold War. In post-Soviet spaces, hip-hop has taken on this role of reinforcing ideas about race. This paper explores the changing notions of "blackness" as it was mediated in pre-Soviet, Soviet, and post-Soviet society through performances of spirituals, jazz, and hip-hop. It analyzes how these musical genres intersected with discourses on slavery/serfdom in pre-revolutionary Russia, the notion of equality in the Soviet era, and racialized concepts of class identity in the post-socialist era. The presentation makes the argument that the complex ways that race has worked its way into politics and social networking in the former Soviet Union, a society that once claimed "racism did not exist" has much to do with how musical networkings both reinforce and alleviate growing xenophobia since the fall of the Soviet Union.
Adriana Helbig is an assistant professor of music and an affiliated faculty member in Cultural Studies, Women's Studies, Global Studies, and at the Center for Russian and East European Studies in the University of Pittsburgh. She is the co-author, with Oksana Buranbaeva and Vanja Mladineo, of The Culture and Customs of Ukraine (Greenwood Press, 2009). Her book Hip-Hop Revolution: Music, Race, and Migration in Ukraine will be published by Indiana University Press.

Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Co-sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, November 9, 5:30-7:30 pm
Alexander Motyl
(Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University), Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture: "The Holodomor and History: Bringing the Ukrainians Back In."

Alexander Motyl is a professor of political science and deputy director of the Division of Global Affairs at Rutgers-Newark. He  is noted for his prolific writings on contemporary politics in Eastern Europe, Ukraine, and Russia, as well as for more theoretical explorations into the nature of nationalism, empire, and revolution. Over the past two and a half decades, he has written six books of nonfiction and contributed dozens of articles to academic and policy journals, newspaper op-ed pages, and magazines. He also has managed, by dint of enviable self-discipline and resourcefulness, to publish two novels, while also pursuing a career as a painter.

Register here
Room 100 of the Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St George Street, University of Toronto
Co-sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, The Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office, and the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch.

Tuesday, November 13, 12:00-2:00 pm
Sofia Dyak
(Director of the Center for Urban History of East Central Europe in Lviv, Ukraine), "Doing History": Public Outreach, Applied History and Research Challenges at the Centre for Urban History in Lviv."

The talk will focus on the activities of a privately funded institute of historical scholarship in Lviv. Dr. Sofia Dyak, director of the Center, will discuss the two primary areas of the Center's work - research and public outreach projects - to explain both how such an institution developed in Ukraine, and the challenges facing it in the future. Dr. Dyak will also address the larger question of the meanings of "public history": how to prevent history from being abused for political ends in contemporary Ukraine; how to offer fresh intellectual impulses and promote scholarly exchanges; how to offer young Ukrainian researchers opportunities to do advanced, internationally recognized work in their own country and thus address the issue of the "brain drain" emigration of qualified scholars; how to go beyond academia and participate in contemporary society in productive cooperation with public and cultural institutions. Special attention will be paid to the use of technology in realizing "public history" and the digital history projects realized at the Center.

Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies.

Wednesday, November 14, 12:00-2:00 PM
"What People are Thinking" A Conversation with Vasyl Gabor
:
Petro Jacyk Program Meeting Ukrainian Writers Series (Mr Gabor will be interviewed by Profs. Taras Koznarsky and Maxim Tarnawsky)

Vasyl Gabor is the author of numerous short stories collected in volumes entitled "A Book of Exotic Dreams and Real Events," 1999 and "And that which People Are Thinking," 2012. His stories have been translated into English, German, Serbian, Slovak, Croatian, Czech, Japanese and Bulgarian.

Mr. Gabor is also known as a literary critic and publisher. He is best known as the editor of an award-winning series of books of contemporary Ukrainian literature published under the general title Pryvatna Kolektsiia (A Private Collection).
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Danylo Husar Struk Programme in Ukrainian Literature of CIUS.

Friday, January 11, 2013, 2:00-4:00 PM
Nadia Kravets
(Postdoctoral fellow at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian studies, Harvard University) "Withering interdependence?: Ukraine-Russia energy relations since the Orange Revolution?"

Despite substantial economic interdependence in the energy sphere, officials in Kyiv have historically failed to make the country less reliant on Russian energy sources, thus making it possible for the authorities in Moscow to employ its 'energy weapon'. This asymmetric interdependence has become a source of conflict between the two states, undermining Ukraine's security, political democratization and market liberalization. In addition, conflicts in the energy sphere between Kyiv and Moscow have become a security concern for the EU and its member states, encouraging EU's efforts to diversify its energy supplies away from Russian sources and Ukrainian pipelines. However, recent developments in global and regional energy markets, coupled with the attempts by the Ukrainian authorities to diversify country's energy supplies, for the first time point to the reduction of Ukraine's dependence on Russian energy sources, opening a possibility of a more independent security and foreign policy conduct. The lecture will discuss how market changes in the energy sphere within Ukraine, Europe and the globe bear on Ukraine's transit capacity, security, and domestic political and economic transformations.
Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Monday, January 14, 2013, 2:00-4:00 PM
Roundtable "Frenemies: Can Ukraine and Russia Normalize Relations?"

Ukraine currently must negotiate the geopolitical challenge of its location between Europe and Russia. Ukraine possesses gas lines crucial for getting Russian gas to Europe, but they are dependent on deals with Russia. The Black Sea Fleet is Russian, but parked in Ukraine's harbor. With all the vicissitudes of history, rigged elections, and personalities, can these two countries ever be friends? What are Russia's foreign and security goals and challenges towards Ukraine? What are Ukraine's towards Russia? This roundtable will discuss the challenges and possibilities for normalization of relations between Ukraine and Russia. Is politics even possible?
Dr. Helena Yakovlev-Golani (Halbert Postdoctoral Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs) will speak on Russia's foreign policy towards Ukraine, and Dr. Nadiya Kravets (Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University) Ukraine's towards Russia. Dr. Seva Gunitsky, University of Toronto, will serve as discussant.
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Wednesday, January 23, 2013, 3:00-5:00 PM
Taras Kuzio (Center for Transatlantic Relations (CTR), School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University), "Ukrainian Contemporary Politics as Cycles of Ukrainian History: Shelest-Kuchma and Sherbytskyy-Yanukovych". Lucan Way (Chair, University of Toronto)

Taras Kuzio is Non-Resident Fellow, Center for Transatlantic Relations (CTR), School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University. In 2010-2012 he wrote the book A Contemporary History of Ukraine as a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Slavic Research Center, Hokkaido University, Japan, and as a Senior Visiting Fellow at CTR, SAIS, John Hopkins University, Washington DC. Taras Kuzio the author of 5 think tank monographs, including The Crimea: Europe's Next Flashpoint? (2010) and EU and Ukraine: a turning point in 2004? (2003), 25 book chapters, and 75 scholarly articles on post-communist and Ukrainian politics, nationalism and European security.
Dr. Kusio received a BA in Economics from the University of Sussex, an MA in Soviet and Eastern European Studies from the University of London and a PhD in Political Science from the University of Birmingham, England. He was a Post-doctoral Fellow at Yale University.
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday, February 14, 2013, 6:00-9:00 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

The Firecrosser director Mykhailo Illienko, 2012

Feature narrative, 105 min. Ukraine's official entry for the Oscar consideration in the Best Foreign Language Film category. This melodrama is inspired by the real-life story of one Ivan Datsenko (Ivan Dodoka in the film), native of the village of Chernechyi Yar in central Ukraine. He becomes a fearsome fighter pilot during World War Two, earning the highest military distinction bestowed by Stalin. He escapes first from a Nazi and then Soviet concentration camps, flees to Canada, where - suspend your disbelief - Datsenko allegedly becomes the chieftain of an Iroquois tribe. This is the first in years Ukrainian film that received a national distribution and enjoyed an unprecedented box-office success in Ukraine

The screening will be followed by Q&A and discussion, mediated by Yuri Shevchuk, the Ukrainian Film Club's director.
The event is free and open to the public. The films will be shown in its Ukrainian or Russian language version with English subtitles. Download poster here.
Register here
Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave, Toronto, ON M5S1J5
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University and Kontakt Ukrainian TV Network.

Friday, February 15, 2013, 6:00-8:00 pm
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Ukrainian Cinema since Independence

"Soviet Film and Stalin's War of Peasants, 1920-1930"

The destruction of independent peasantry by the Bolshevik regime was orchestrated with an unparalleled efficiency both in terms of the actual physical elimination of millions branded kulaks and the moral justification of the mass murder to the largely acquiescing public opinion within the Soviet Union and abroad. The lecture discusses the role Soviet film played in the preparation and execution of one of the greatest mass murders of European civil population whose scale and consequences are still to be fully appreciated. The lecture presentation is based on the research of a wide body of documents and motion pictures of the period and is richly illustrated with film clips.

The lecture will be presented by Yuri Shevchuk, lecturer of Ukrainian language and culture and director of the Ukrainian Film Club at Columbia University, New York. Download poster here.
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Film Club, Columbia University.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013, 2:00-4:00 PM
Lukasz Jasina
(Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland; Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar) "Poles, Ukrainians and Film: Shared History, Manipulation and the Truth"

Cinema could be considered today's Biblia pauperum, or a poor-man's bible, one using pictures and images to convey incontrovertible truths. Films offer many people a source of historical knowledge that is more influential than books, journals, or formal education at school or university. Recent Polish and Ukrainian movies such as "With Fire and Sword," "In Darknesss," and "Metropolitan Andrey" do offer audiences a certain historical truth, but more serve as a medium for manipulating and re-narrating history. This presentation will discuss the mechanism of creating "moving pictures" of shared Polish and Ukrainian history in contemporary cinematography.
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, March 1, 2013, 10:00-12:00 PM
Tarik Cyril Amar
(Assistant Professor, Columbia University, Department of History) "Lviv under German Occupation, 1941-1944"

Tarik Amar works on the history of the Soviet Union, Russia and East Central Europe. His manuscript "Paradox City" focuses on the often violent twentieth-century transformations of the borderland city of Lviv, also known as Lwow, Lvov, and Lemberg. Between 2007 and 2010 he directed the Center for Urban History of East Central Europe in Lviv.
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Thursday/Friday, March 7 (5:30pm-7:00pm) - March 8 (9:00am-6:00pm), 2013
The Roma in Europe: From the Holocaust to the Decade of Roma Inclusion
Bernard Rorke
(Keynote Speaker, International Research and Advocacy Director, Open Society Roma Initiatives Office)

The Roma in Europe: From the Holocaust to the Decade of Roma Inclusion is a graduate student conference hosted by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs.
For Conference Programme and Registration click here
Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, Munk School of Global Affairs, the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto, Germany/Europe Study and Research Fund, Hart House Good Ideas Fund, CERES Graduate Student Association and the Graduate Students' Union

Friday, March 8, 2013, 4:00-6:00 PM
Susan Viets
(Author) Picnic at the Iron Curtain: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to Ukraine's Orange Revolution, August 2012

Welcome to the world of collapsing Communism. It is the eve of the fall of the Berlin Wall when people are still willing to risk all to cross the Iron Curtain to the West. In this adventure-packed memoir Susan Viets, a student turned journalist, arrives in Communist Hungary in 1988 and begins reporting for the Guardian, not at all prepared for what lies ahead. She helps East Germans escape to the West at a picnic, moves to the Soviet Union where she battles authorities for accreditation as the first foreign journalist in Ukraine and then watches, amazed, as the entire political system collapses. Lured by new travel opportunities, Viets shops her way across Central Asia, stumbling into a tank attack in Tajikistan and the start of the Tajik civil war. "Picnic at the Iron Curtain" shows every day people at the centre of dramatic events from Budapest to Bishkek and Chernobyl to Chechnya. It is a memoir that spans a period of momentous historical change from 1988-1998, following through with an eyewitness account of Ukraine's Orange Revolution in 2004.
The Book Launch will be Chaired by Marta Dyczok (Associate Professor, Western University)
Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

EXTERNAL Monday, March 11, 2013, 7:00-9:00 PM
Volodymyr Mezentsev
(Ph. D. Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta),"The 2012 Excavations in Baturyn, Ukraine: Intellectual Pursuits and Artistic Appreciation of the Cossack Elite at Hetman Mazepa's Court"(in Ukrainian)
Ukrainian Cultural Centre (83 Christie St., Toronto)
Sponsored by the Ucrainica Research Institute and Desna Foundation Information: (416) 766-1408

Monday, March 11, 2013, 12:00-2:00 PM
Serhiy Kudelia
(Assistant Professor of Political Science, Department of Political Science, Baylor University) "Anger, Greed and Treachery: Reading the Writing on the Wall of Ukraine's Autocracy"

The last parliamentary election in Ukraine exposed strong authoritarian proclivities of the country's rulers, but also demonstrated a striking competitiveness of its party system and a growing discontent of the society. This talk will address key factors that enabled a rollback of Ukraine's earlier democratic gains, but prevented the ruling elite from establishing a full-fledged authoritarian regime. It will also examine various indicators of regime stability or lack thereof including cohesiveness of the ruling elite, strength of the party of power, loyalty of the oligarchs, viability of opposition forces and mobilization capacity of the civil society. In conclusion the talk will assess near-term prospects of democratic change in Ukraine and the conditions of its further slide towards authoritarianism.
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 2:00-4:00 PM
Elena Semenova
(Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar) "Businessmen in Parliaments of Central and Eastern Europe: a Quantitative Analysis"

The presentation focuses on parliamentary recruitment and careers of businessmen in 14 Eastern and Central European countries. More specifically, socio-demographic profile, prior political experience (also during the Soviet period), and parliamentary career duration of businessmen will be scrutinized in a longitudinal perspective. A specific emphasis of this presentation will be done on the Russian and Ukrainian national parliaments (the State Duma and the Verkhovna Rada). Elena Semenova is a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Jena, Germany. Her recent articles appeared in Comparative Sociology, Historical Social Research, and East European Politics and Societies.
Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, March 15, 2013, 10:00-12:00 PM
Maria Sonevytsky
(Jacyk Visiting Instructor and Research Fellow at the Harriman Institute at Columbia University) "Chornobyl Songs: "Nature" after Nuclear Disaster"

Maria Sonevytsky is an ethnomusicologist and musician based in Brooklyn, NY. Her primary research interests include discourses of indigeneity and "wildness" in post-Soviet Ukrainian popular music, cultural policy, music and nationalism, and folklore and nuclear experience after Chornobyl. She also works on critical organology, and wrote her M.A. Thesis on the piano accordion and its "cultural baggage" among performers in New York City. In February 2012, she received her PhD in Ethnomusicology from Columbia University. Her dissertation, "Wild Music": Ideologies of Exoticism in Two Ukrainian Borderlands", was based on fieldwork that she did in Crimea and Western Ukraine (among Hutsuls) in 2008-9 and was awarded distinction. In the fall of 2012, she was a Mihaychuk Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. In the spring semester of 2013, she will be a Jacyk Visiting Instructor and Research Fellow at the Harriman Institute at Columbia University. For more information please visit www.mariasonevytsky.com
Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, March 15, 2013, 6:00-8:00 PM
Zozulka Sings Village Songs from Polissia and Poltava, Ukraine
(Zozulka Trio: Eva Salina-Primack, Maria Sonevytsky and Willa Roberts)

In Ukrainian villages, the zozulka - the little cuckoo bird - bears sad news, brings bad luck, foreshadows heartbreak. Zozulka, featuring Eva Salina Primack, Willa Roberts, and Maria Sonevytsky, brings the haunting multi-part women's vocal repertoire of the Ukrainian village to life in expressive, dynamic interpretations of songs that are little-known beyond Ukraine. Rich with harmony, strident unisons, and powerful lyrics, these songs transport you to the dense forests and wide-open steppes of another place and time.
Register here
Piano Room, 7 Hart House Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 3H3
Sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Monday, March 18, 2013, 4:00-6:00 PM
Serhiy Bilenky
(Author) Romantic Nationalism in Eastern Europe: Russian, Polish, and Ukrainian Political Imaginations, Stanford University Press, May 2012

This book explores the political imagination of Eastern Europe in the 1830s and 1840s, when Polish, Russian, and Ukrainian intellectuals came to identify themselves as belonging to communities known as nations or nationalities. Bilenky approaches this topic from a transnational perspective, revealing the ways in which modern Russian, Polish, and Ukrainian nationalities were formed and refashioned through the challenges they presented to one another, both as neighboring communities and as minorities within a given community. Further, all three nations defined themselves as a result of their interactions with the Russian and Austrian empires. Fueled by the Romantic search for national roots, they developed a number of separate yet often overlapping and inclusive senses of national identity, thereby producing myriad versions of Russianness, Polishness, and Ukrainianness.
Register here
Room 208, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Tuesday, April 2, 2013, 2:00-4:00 PM
Volodymyr Viatrovych
(Kiev Mohyla University, Kiev, Ukraine) Following the Evidence: New Archives and the Ukrainian Liberation Movement

Volodymyr Viatrovych is a historian of the Ukrainian nationalist movement. In 2009-2010, he was a director of the State Archive of Security Service of Ukraine and worked on declassifying KGB archives. He established a network of inquiry centres and e-Archive and founded the Center for Research on the Liberation Movement.
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Chair of Ukrainian Studies, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Friday, April 5, 2013, 11:00-1:00 PM
Mark Andryczyk
(Author) The Intellectual as Hero in 1990s Ukrainian Fiction, University of Toronto Press, March 2012

The 1990s were a period of tremendous artistic vigour, experimentation, and liberation for Ukrainian culture. The artists who emerged at this time unleashed a tidal wave of creativity that deliberately and aggressively reshaped inherited models. In this first English monograph on contemporary Ukrainian literature, Mark Andryczyk provides an in-depth analysis of the cultural explosion that engulfed Ukraine in its first decade of independence. The Intellectual as Hero in 1990s Ukrainian Fiction weaves a fascinating narrative full of colourful characters by examining the prose of today's leading writers. Andryczyk delves into the role of the intellectual in forging a post-Soviet Ukrainian identity, and follows these protagonists as they soar and stumble in pursuit of redefining their creative realm. In addition to introducing readers to vibrant literary gems, this book explores the artistic tendencies that determined the course of the Ukrainian cultural scene in the 1990s, and continue to shape it today.
Register here
Room 108, North Building, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 7:30 PM
"THE GUARDIAN OF THE PAST" A documentary by Malgorzata Potocka

Malgorzata Potocka's award-winning documentary, The Guardian of the Past, is about the art historian Borys Voznytsky, who fought to preserve some twelve thousand works of religious art. Voznytsky spent decades traveling around Ukraine and its abandoned churches in search of neglected icons, religious paintings, sculptures, and liturgical objects. Potocka's film offers an exclusive peek at the collection, maintained until today at the St. Bernard Monastery in Olesko, Ukraine, where Voznytsky first hid it. In 2013 the National Art Gallery in Lviv and the Mystetskyi Arsenal (Art Arsenal), a former munitions factory turned into Kyiv's largest art space, created the Boris Voznytsky Award in recognition of outstanding contribution in the field of fostering and furthering museum development.
Register here
Download poster here
St. Vladimir's Institute, 620 Spadina Ave, Toronto
Sponsored by the Polish Cultural Institute New York, Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History, University of Toronto, St. Vladimir's Institute, Toronto, and the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine.
 

 


   
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