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Munk Centre
 

 

All events are free and open to the public, but registration is generally required. Registration links are provided below for each event.


EVENTS IN 2015-2016

UPCOMING EVENTS

Stay tuned!

PAST EVENTS

Thursday, September 24, 4-6 pm

Panel discussion "War in Ukraine"

What is the status of Ukraine's war with Russia in Donbas? What are the prospects of resolution? Will pro Russian forces push further or is a cold conflict the most likely outcome? These are some of the questions that will be addressed by the three prominent panelists.

Speakers:

Yuri Zhukov (Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan);
Marta Dyczok (Associate Professor, Western University);
Taras Kuzio (Senior Fellow, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies).

Chair: Lucan Way (Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto)

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

 

Friday, September 25, 12-2 pm

Yuri Zhukov (Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan):

The Economics of Rebellion in Eastern Ukraine

Using new micro-level data on violence in Eastern Ukraine, this article evaluates the relative merits of `identity-based’ and `economic’ explanations of civil conflict. The first view expects rebellion to be most likely in areas home to the geographic concentration of ethnolinguistic minorities. The second expects more rebel activity where the opportunity costs of insurrection are low. Evidence from the armed conflict in Ukraine supports the second view more than the first. A municipality’s prewar employment mix is a more robust predictor of rebel activity than local ethnolinguistic composition. Municipalities more exposed to trade shocks with Russia experienced a higher intensity of rebel violence throughout the conflict. Such localities also fell under rebel control earlier — and took longer for the government to liberate — than municipalities where the labor force was less dependent on exports to Russia.

Yuri Zhukov is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and a Faculty Associate with the Center for Political Studies at the Institute for Social Research. His research on international and civil conflict has been published in the American Political Science Review, Foreign Affairs, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Peace Research and other peer-reviewed and generalaudience publications.

Room 3130, Sidney Smith Hall (100 St. George Street)

No registration is required.

The event is co-sponsored by the Political Science Department (University of Toronto), the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Thursday, October 15, 4-6 pm

Jonathan Waterlow (Petro Jacyk Visiting Post-Doctoral Fellow; British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellow at the University of Oxford, UK):

Laughter Through Tears? Political Jokes and Popular Opinion in Stalin's 1930s

Chair: Lynne Viola (Professor of History, University of Toronto)

Traditional historiography of everyday life under Stalin in the 1930s long portrayed ordinary citizens as either brainwashed or terrified into silence; more recently, we have come to speak of ‘grey zones’ and blurred lines. Drawing on extensive archival research in Kyiv, Moscow and St Petersburg, this paper argues that we can add some colour and definition to those ‘grey zones’ by turning to the political humour people shared in these years and what it reveals about their perceptions, struggles, frames of reference, their values, and even perhaps a mental resistance to a regime which promised much and a reality which rarely delivered.

In this time of strict censorship and arbitrary arrests, the exchange of jokes, anekdoty and humorous poems was a vital means by which ordinary people could express their critical opinions about the Soviet regime and its policies (the appalling effects of collectivisation and the Five-Year Plans in Ukraine will be a particular focus in this paper). Moreover, when they shared this humour, they were taking a considerable risk, giving us insight into the making and breaking of trust bonds in this still-molten society.

In exploring this material, I pose the questions: was this ‘laughter through tears’ – i.e. a moderately successful coping mechanism? A ‘weapon of the weak’ eroding Soviet power at its foundations? Or was it something rather different?

I propose an intricate blend of popular acceptance and criticism or, rather, of acceptance through the process of criticism. By criticising the immutable, ordinary Soviet citizens could retain some agency of their own and shared these interpretive acts widely with those whom they trusted. These processes created a pathway to adaptation and simultaneously shaped a complex interaction between the population and official ideology. My research demonstrates neither outright rejection nor a hermetically sealed alternative worldview, but finds instead a popular desire that the system should live up to its claims, combined with a subtle, popular reclamation of official language which attempted to paper over the cracks between ideology and lived reality.

Register here

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, October 22, 10 am-5 pm

Starvation as a Political Tool From the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Century: the Irish Famine, the Armenian Genocide, the Ukrainian Holodomor and Genocide by Attrition in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan

States have many tools at their disposal to suppress their subjects: the military, police, taxes, and laws, to name a few. The extent to which starvation has been used, or became a way to discriminate against, punish or eliminate national, ethnic, racial or religious groups (as described in the UN Genocide Convention) has not always been appreciated. The symposium focuses on four case studies to shed light on the politics of starvation, examining methods, their effectiveness as instruments of government policy, and the devastating effects on target populations.

10:00 a.m.— Session One  

Rethinking "The Famine Plot": The Case of the Great Irish Famine, 1845-1851
Mark McGowan, University of Toronto

Forced Starvation in the Armenian Genocide
George Shirinian, Zoryan Institute

Discussant: Joyce Apsel, New York University
Chair: Doris Bergen, University of Toronto

12:00 noon—lunch break

1:00 p.m. — Session Two

Stalin and Starvation as a Tool To Tame the Ukrainian Peasantry
Andrea Graziosi, University of Naples

Genocide by Attrition in the Nuba Mountains, Sudan: From Malnutrition to Severe Malnutrition to Starvation, Samuel Totten, University of Arkansas (Emeritus)

Discussant: Joyce Apsel, New York University
Chair: TBA

3:30 p.m. — The Holodomor through Oral History: Presentation of the Transformation of Civil Society Project by  Natalia Khanenko-Friesen, University of Saskatchewan

http://www.holodomor.ca/starvation-as-a-political-tool.html

Charbonnel Lounge, Elmsley Hall, 81 St. Mary’s Street (1st floor) (please note the new location)

Register here

Organized by the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta; the International Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies; the Petro Jacyk Program at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures (University of Toronto).

Thursday, October 29, 9.15-4 pm

Workshop "Germany and the Ukrainian-Russian Conflict"

In the wake of Euromaidan, Germany has played a leading role in shaping Western policies toward the long and perhaps frozen conflict between Moscow and Kyiv. With its leading position in the EU, economic relations with Eastern Europe, and close historical ties with Russia and Ukraine, Germany was fated to play a major role in dealing with the crisis in the East. But this has not proven a simple task. Russia’s disregard for the Budapest Memorandum and its annexation of the Crimea have undermined the German policy of promoting secure, stable, and predictable relations between Russia and the EU. Decades of a German Ostpolitik, based on constructive engagement with the Soviet Union/Russia, have been threatened, as Berlin has found less and less common ground with Moscow. At the same time, Germany’s relative neglect of Ukraine in the past has been replaced by new attention to Kyiv and the Ukrainian internal politics.

In its two panel sessions, the workshop will explore both (1) historical relations between Germany and the states and societies located on the territories of contemporary Russia and Ukraine and (2) the sources and evolution of contemporary German policy on the confrontation in the East. The historical panel will consider, inter alia, why most German historians and intellectuals have concentrated on Russia to the neglect of Ukraine. In Germany’s memory culture, one of the most developed and self-critical in the world, Ukraine plays a relatively small role, despite the important impact of Germany on Ukrainian affairs during World War I and the fact that a significant part of Germany’s war of extermination and the Holocaust during World War II took place on the territory of Ukraine. The contemporary panel will address Germany’s cautious response to the Orange Revolution and Euromaidan, notwithstanding their similarities to the 1989 demonstrations in Leipzig and East Berlin. Arguably, the United States and Canada have been more ready to accept Ukraine as a sovereign state and autonomous society than has Germany. In short, the workshop will discuss both the complex history of Ukrainian-German relations and the ‘German factor’ in today’s crisis and ask what has changed in Germany as a result of the nearly two years of Ukrainian-Russian conflict.

AVAILABLE LIVE: http://hosting2.desire2learncapture.com/MUNK/1/live/353.aspx
Time: Oct 29th 2015 @ 9.15 am

Workshop Schedule

9:15: Welcome and opening of workshop

9:30-12:00 Panel one: Thinking about the History of Germany and Russia/Ukraine

Chair: Professor Paul Robert Magocsi (University of Toronto)

Presenters:

Professor Yaroslav Hrytsak (Ukrainian Catholic University)
Professor James Casteel (Carleton University)

1:30 to 4:00 Panel two: Contemporary Relations

Chair: Professor Volodymyr Kravchenko (University of Alberta)

Presenters:

Professor Klaus Segbers (Free University of Berlin)
Dr. Constanze Stelzenmueller (Brookings)
Professor Alexander Motyl (Rutgers University)

Register here

David and Vivian Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies



Wednesday, November 4, 7-9 pm

Toronto Annual Ukraine Famine Lecture: "The Ukrainian Famine as World History"

Speaker: Timothy Snyder (Housum Professor of History at Yale University)

Timothy Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale University. His book Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin received the literature award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Hannah Arendt Prize, and the Leipzig Book Prize for European Understanding. Bloodlands was named a book of the year by some dozen publications, has been translated into more than twenty languages, and was a bestseller in four countries. Professor Snyder is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Times Literary Supplement. His most recent book is Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning.

The Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture series was established in 1998 at the initiative of the Famine-Genocide Commemorative Committee of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch. Past speakers have included: James Mace, Frank Sysyn, Ian Hunter, Terry Martin, Hiroaki Kuromiya, Olexiy Haran, Mark von Hagen, Lynne Viola, Roman Serbyn, Alex Hinton, Andrea Graziosi, Oleh Wolowyna, Norman Naimark, Alexander Motyl, and Anne Applebaum.

Innis Town Hall Theatre (2 Sussex Ave)

Register here

The lecture is co-sponsored by the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (Toronto Office), University of Alberta; the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, at  the Centre for Russian and East European Studies; and the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies. The lecture began in 1998 at the initiative of the Famine-Genocide Commemorative Committee of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch. 

 

Thursday, November 26, 4-6 pm

A Conversation with Sofiia Andrukhovych (Ukrainian writer, Author of Felix Austria, winner of the BBC 2014 Ukrainian Book of the Year Award)

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

This event is sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine together with the Danylo Husar Struk Program in Ukrainian Literature of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, January 15, 3-5 pm

Book Presentation: Maria Rewakowicz, "Literature, Exile, Alterity. The New York Group of Ukrainian Writers."

Chair: Professor Maxim Tarnawsky (Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto)

This pioneering book that was published in 2014 is the first to present the postwar phenomenon of the New York Group of Ukrainian emigre poets as a case study for exploring cultural and aesthetic ramifications of exile. It focuses on the poets’ diasporic and transnational connections both with their country of origin and their adopted homelands, underscoring the group’s role in the shaping of the cultural and literary image of Ukraine abroad. Displacements, forced or voluntary, engender states of alterity, states of living in-between, living in the interstices of different cultures and different linguistic realities. The poetry of the founding members of the New York Group reflects these states admirably. The poets accepted their exilic condition with no grudges and nurtured the link with their homeland via texts written in the mother tongue. This account of the group’s output and legacy will appeal to all those eager to explore the poetry of East European nations and to those interested in larger cultural contexts for the development of European modernisms.

Born in Poland, Maria G. Rewakowicz is affiliated with the Slavic Department at the University of Washington. She holds a Ph.D. in Slavic Languages and Literatures from the University of Toronto and has taught at Rutgers, Harvard, Columbia and the University of Washington. She is the author of four books of poetry in Ukrainian, two anthologies of the poetry of the New York Group and a book of essays Persona non grata (Kyiv, 2012). She also co-edited the collection Contemporary Ukraine on the Cultural Map of Europe(2009). She is currently working on a monograph on literature and identities in Ukraine since 1991.

For more information on the book, please click here.

No registration is required.

Room 404, Alumni Hall, 121 Joseph Street.

This event is sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine together with the Danylo Husar Struk Program in Ukrainian Literature of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Monday, February 22, 12-2 pm

Andriy Parubiy (First Deputy Speaker, Parliament of Ukraine): Reforms and Security in Ukraine Two Years After the Euromaidan/Revolution of Dignity

Chair: Lucan Way (Associate Professor, Department of Political Science; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine)

Andriy Parubiy is a leading public figure in Ukraine and is regarded as the leader of the Maidan Revolution of Dignity. He is immediate past Secretary of National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine – NSDCU (during the critical period of the onset of Russian aggression) and presently serves as First Deputy Speaker of Parliament. Together with Prime Minister Arseniy Yatseniuk, and NSDC Secretary, Oleksandr Turchynov, he is a founding member of the People’s Front Political Party. He was number four on the list of candidates to Parliament from the People’s Front during the elections to Parliament in October 2014. His organization Maidan Self Defense has 16 members in Parliament that belong to the People’s Front and BPP faction

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies.


Friday, February 26, 10 am-noon

A Conversation with Yuri Butusov

Speaker: Yuri Butusov (Ukrainian journalist and editor-in-chief of the censor.net.ua website)

Chair: Viktor Ostapchuk (Associate Professor, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto)

You are cordially invited to an informal meeting with Yuri Butusov, the Ukrainian journalist and editor-in-chief of the censor.net.ua website and a leading expert on military affairs in Ukraine, who will discuss the state of the Ukrainian military and the war with Russia in the Donbas.

In Ukrainian, with translation as necessary.

Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place) (please note the change of location)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies.


Friday, February 26, 3-5pm

Book Launch: Lucan Alan Way, "Pluralism by Default. Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics" (2015).

Why do some countries that lack preconditions for democracy nevertheless see the rise of democratic political competition?

Pluralism by Default explores sources of political contestation in the former Soviet Union and beyond. Lucan Way proposes that pluralism in “new democracies” is often grounded less in democratic leadership or emerging civil society and more in the failure of authoritarianism. Dynamic competition frequently emerges because autocrats lack the state capacity or organization to steal elections, impose censorship, or repress opposition. In fact, the same institutional failures that facilitate political competition may also thwart the development of stable democracy.

Lucan Way is an associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto and co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at CERES. He is the coauthor of Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War.

For more information on the book, please click here.

Room 3137 (please note that the event has been moved to a new room), Political Science Department, Sidney Smith Hall (100 St. George Street)

No registration is required.

The event is co-sponsored by the Political Science Department (University of Toronto), the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

 

Wednesday, March 9, 6 - 8 pm

Dr. Martin Pollack (an Austrian journalist, essayist, and literary translator of Polish literary works into German, a former correspondent of Der Spiegel in Vienna and Warsaw): The Myth of Galicia

Dr. Pollack in an Austrian journalist, writer, and German-language translator of Polish authors. A former correspondent of Der Spiegel in Vienna and Warsaw, he is the author or editor of 15 books and the recipient of 12 awards. Much of Dr. Pollack’s writing concerns history in twentieth-century Poland and Ukraine and current events in those countries. Three of his books have been published in Ukrainian translation, and one is forthcoming.

St. Vladimir Institute, 620 Spadina Avenue

The event is sponsored by the Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies and St. Vladimir Institute and co-sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

 

Friday, April 1, 10 am-5 pm

Workshop: Critical Contexts of the Ukraine Conflict: Uncommon Perspectives

Theses abound with regard to the events that took place on Kyiv’s Maidan over the winter of
2013-14 and its many outcomes, including Ukraine’s ongoing conflict with Russia. This
conference will bring together several experts on the region to discuss the impact of these events
on local people’s everyday lives. Speakers will present in-depth analyses based on interviews
with the internally displaced, studies of shifting priorities in media coverage, and emerging
initiatives among several groups of activists, NGOs, and others committed to addressing civic
issues of increasing concern.

10 -10.15 am Opening Remarks

10.15-12:00 pm. Panel 1: Information and Democracy: Media, Student Activism, and the Role of the Church

Moderator: Serhiy Kovalchuk (PhD, OISE, University of Toronto)

Speakers:

Marta Dyczok (Professor, Political Science/History, Western University): Faces of Displacement

Diana Dukhanova (PhD candidate, Slavic Department, Brown University): Proxy War: The Ukrainian Orthodox Church Schism in Russian Mass Media

Emily Channell-Justice (PhD candidate, the Graduate Centre, CUNY): Direct Action: Ukrainian Student Activism Before and During Maidan

1:30-3 pm. Panel 2: After the Revolution of Dignity: Mass Displacement, Disability Activism, and Solutions to Intimate Partner Violence

Moderator: Katarzyna Korycki (PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto)

Speakers:

Sarah Phillips (Director, REEI and Professor of Anthropology, Indiana University Bloomington): Disability, Gender, and Citizenship in War-Torn Ukraine.

Iryna Balabukha (PhD, Syracuse University, College of Human Dynamics): Intimate Partner Violence in Ukraine - Social, Legal, and Gendered Contexts.

Jessica Zychowicz (Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow, CERES, Munk): Why Art Now? Kyiv Artists' Narratives of Identity, Gender, and Conflict

3.15-5 pm Film Screening: "This is Gay Propaganda: LGBT Rights and the War in Ukraine," Directed by Marusya Bociurkiw.

Register here

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

This event is co-sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Toronto; the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and the Department of History, University of Toronto.

Monday, April 18, 4-6 pm

Liudmyla Pidkuimukha (Assistant Professor, Ukrainian Language Department, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy; Petro Jacyk Visiting Professor):

The Language Situation in Lviv During the Interwar Period

Chair: Taras Koznarsky (Associate Professor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto)

Since its foundation Lviv has been situated on a border of different cultures and languages. Throughout its existence, the city belonged to different states. The dominant national structure changed in accordance to it. In addition to Polish, Ukrainian, German and Jewish population, there existed an Armenian minority and the Czechs, Russians, Belarusians and Tatars were represented in small numbers in Lviv during the interwar period. My research demonstrates how ethnic situation influenced on formation of Ukrainian language. The texts by young writers of the "Twelve" literary group, which functioned in Lviv during the inter-war period, were chosen for analysis. The study showed that a full-structured multifunctional Ukrainian language was utilized in the social and cultural space of the inter-war Lviv. Its vocabulary included words to denote the concepts and realities in different spheres of public life, urban space, household activities and forms of etiquette communication. The Ukrainian authentic vocabulary and significant borrowings from the languages in the same territory comprised the basis for Lviv koine. Moreover, my research describes the subculture of batyars and their language. The batyars were the name of the lower-class inhabitants of Lviv (the "elite of Lviv's streets"). A typical batyar in common imagination was usually financially challenged, but also an honest and generous urban citizen with a great sense of humor. The batyars spoke their special language which was called Balak or Batyar Slang. The active use of “balak” was observed till 30th of 20th century, it was even fashionable to use “balak” during this time on the pages of humorous papers, in films and in broadcastings. My research also discusses school and sport slangs in Lviv during the interwar period. Despite the big share of borrowings from other languages, the Ukrainian vocabulary formed the main part of school and sport slangs. Pupils and students tried to avoid using Polish. As Yurij Shevelev wrote, at this time in Lviv the Ukrainian language was not only the language of communication but also the language of struggle.

Dr. Liudmyla Pidkuimukha is an Assistant Professor at the Ukrainian Language Department, Faculty of Humanities, the National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy” (Kyiv, Ukraine). Liudmyla has completed her PhD thesis, entitled Lexical Characteristics of Western Region Variety of Standard Ukrainian Language (Based on Lviv Writers’ Texts 1-st Half of XXth Century), which is focused on language situation in Lviv during the interwar period and is rooted in both social sciences and humanities. The interwar Lviv is the central focus of this research because Liudmyla finds it very interesting to compare ethnic situation with language situation during this period, to study state and status of the Ukrainian Language at that time Lviv. Liudmyla is particularly interested in the literary production of theinterwar period and in the modern Ukrainian prose. Besides linguistics, Dr. Pidkuimukha is interested in cultural, historical and urban studies.

Room 108N, 1 Devonshire Place (Munk School of Global Affairs)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Wednesday, April 20, 4-6 pm

Stories of Khmelnytsky

Join us for a panel discussion of the literary legacies of Bohdan Khmelnytsky. This event marks the publication of a new edited volume, Stories of Khmelnytsky: Competing Literary Legacies of the 1648 Ukrainian Cossack Uprising. Contributing authors Frank Sysyn, Taras Koznarsky, Adam Teller, and Amelia Glaser will speak about Khmelnytsky’s charismatic and contentious legacy in Ukrainian, Jewish, Polish, and Russian collective memory. In the middle of the seventeenth century, Bohdan Khmelnytsky was the legendary Cossack general who organized a rebellion that liberated the Eastern Ukraine from Polish rule. Consequently, he has been memorialized in the Ukraine as a God-given nation builder, cut in the model of George Washington. But in this campaign, the massacre of thousands of Jews perceived as Polish intermediaries was the collateral damage, and in order to secure the tentative independence, Khmelnytsky signed a treaty with Moscow, ultimately ceding the territory to the Russian tsar. So, was he a liberator or a villain? This volume examines drastically different narratives, from Ukrainian, Jewish, Russian, and Polish literature, that have sought to animate, deify, and vilify the seventeenth-century Cossack. Khmelnytsky’s legacy, either as nation builder or as antagonist, has inhibited inter-ethnic and political rapprochement at key moments throughout history and, as we see in recent conflicts, continues to affect Ukrainian, Jewish, Polish, and Russian national identity.

Chair:

Robert Paul Magocsi (Professor, Department of History; the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto)

Presenters:

Amelia Glaser (Associate Professor, Director of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Program at UC San Diego)

Taras Koznarsky (Associate Professor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures)

Frank Sysyn (Director, the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies)

Adam Teller (Associate Professor of History, Associate Professor of Judaic Studies, Brown University)

Room 108N, 1 Devonshire Place (Munk School of Global Affairs)

Register here

This event is co-sponsored by: the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine; the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Toronto; the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta; the Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto; the Chair of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Toronto; the Ukrainian-Jewish Encounter; the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Wednesday, April 27, 8.30-4 pm

Conference: "Strengthening NATO - the Warsaw Summit and Beyond"

Preliminary Program:

08:30 – 09:00 Registration / Coffee
09:00 – 09:05 Welcome: Robert C Austin, Associate Professor, CERES, Munk School of Global Affairs (Canada)
09:05 – 09:25 Key note speech – Representative of the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of National Defense or the National Security Bureau (Poland) (TBC)
09:25 – 09:30 Q&A session

09:30 – 11:00 I Panel discussion: Where are we? NATO after the Wales Summit.
Moderator: Marcin Bosacki – Ambassador of Poland to Canada (Poland)
Panelists:
• (TBC)
• Brian Lee Crowley – Managing Director, Macdonald-Laurier Institute (Canada)
• John. E. Herbst – Director, Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center at the Atlantic Council, former US Ambassador to Ukraine (USA)

11:00 – 11:30 Coffee break


11:30 – 13:00 II Panel discussion: What are we facing? Unstable East – Ukraine and Russia.

Moderator: Lucan Way, Munk School of Global Affairs (Canada)
Panelists:
• Sławomir Dębski – Director of the Polish Institute of International Affairs (Poland)
• James Sherr – Associate Fellow of the Chatham House (United Kingdom)
• Lieutenant-Colonel Jason Guiney – former Commander of Canada’s Joint Task Force Ukraine (Canada)
• Commander Pascal Belhumeur - Commanding Officer HMCS Winnipeg, deployed on Op. REASSURANCE (Canada)

13:00 – 14:00 Lunch

14:00 – 15:30 III Panel discussion: What do we need to do? The Warsaw Summit and beyond.

Moderator: Paul Wells – Macleans (Canada)
Panelists:
• Michał Miarka – Deputy Director, Security Policy Bureau, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Poland (Poland)
• Kerry Buck – Canada’s Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the North Atlantic Council (Canada)
• Markus Kaim – Senior Fellow, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (Germany)

15:30 – 15:45 Closing remarks – Randall Hansen – Director, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs (Canada)

Register here

David and Vivian Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

This event is sponsored by the Embassy of the Republic of Poland in Ottawa; the Nato Association of Canada; the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine; and the Chair in Polish History at the University of Toronto.

 

Thursday, May 12, 4-6 pm

Mykola Riabchuk (Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Political and Nationalities’ Studies in Kyiv):

Farewell to a "Wonderful Slavonic People": Ethnic Othering and Stereotyping During the Russo-Ukrainian War

Chair: Lucan Way (Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto)

The ongoing Russo-Ukrainian war, euphemistically called “the Ukraine crisis”, has revealed a dramatic gap between the imaginary Ukraine (“a wonderful Slavonic people”, in Aleksandr Dugin’s terms) created by three centuries of the Russian imperial mythmaking and the real Ukraine that evolved as an alternative and ultimately a bold denial of those efforts. The paper examines Russian stereotypes of Ukrainians as an important element of that mythmaking and deconstructs them as the instruments of imperial manipulation, discursive dominance and, nowadays, unscrupulous propagandistic war. It contends that the popular view of Ukrainians and Russians as “almost the same people” becomes increasingly obsolete since it refers primarily to common soil and blood, culture and history, contrary to Ukrainians’ attempts to develop civic identity and establish a value-based rather than ethnic proximity to democratic nations of Europe.

Mykola Riabchuk is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Political and Nationalities’ Studies in Kyiv and a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the George Washington University, USA. He published a number of books and many articles on postcommunist transformations, state-nation building, nationalism and national identity in Ukraine. His last books include “Gleichschaltung. Authoritarian Consolidation in Ukraine, 2010-2012” (2012, in both Ukrainian and English) and “Postcolonial Syndrom” (2011), translated also into Polish (2015) and Hungarian (2016).

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and Department of Political Science, University of Toronto.

   
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