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All events are free and open to the public, but registration is generally required. Registration links are provided below for each event.


EVENTS IN 2016-2017

UPCOMING EVENTS

Stay tuned! If you'd like to receive announcements of the Petro Jacyk Program's events, please send an email to olga.kesarchuk@utoronto.ca

PAST EVENTS

Friday, September 9, 4-6 pm

Book launch: Ukraine's Euromaidan: Broadcasting through Information Wars with Hromadske Radio

Speaker and author: Marta Dyczok (Associate Professor of History and Political Science, Western University)

Chair: Olivia Ward (Foreign Affairs Correspondent, the Toronto Star)

How can you counteract an information war? Hromadske Radio, Public Radio Ukraine, decided to provide accurate and objective information to audiences – free of state and corporate censorship and any kind of manipulation. They broadcasted throughout Ukraine’s Euromaidan, and beyond. This book brings together a series of English language reports on the Ukraine crisis first broadcast on Hromadske Radio between 3 February 2014 and 7 August 2015. Collected and transcribed here, they offer a kaleidoscopic chronicle of events in Ukraine. Bookending the reports, purpose written introduction and conclusion sections contextualize the independent radio project within the larger picture of Ukraine’s media and political developments – both before the Euromaidan and in its dramatic aftermath. The book also features a preface by David R. Marples.

For more information on the book, please follow this link: http://www.e-ir.info/2016/03/22/open-access-book-ukraines-euromaidan-broadcasting-through-information-wars-with-hromadske-radio/

Marta Dyczok is Associate Professor at the Departments of History and Political Science, Western University, Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, and Adjunct Professor at the National University of the Kyiv Mohyla Academy. She has published five books, including Ukraine’s Euromaidan. Broadcasting through Information Wars with Hromadske Radio (2016) Ukraine Twenty Years After Independence: Assessments, Perspectives, Challenges (co-edited with Giovanna Brogi, 2015), Media, Democracy and Freedom. The Post Communist Experience (co-edited with Oxana Gaman-Golutvina, 2009), articles in various journals including The Russian Journal of Communication (2014), Demokratizatsiya (2014), and regularly provides media commentary. Her doctorate is from Oxford University and she researches mass media, memory, migration, and history.

Olivia Ward is a foreign affairs reporter for The Toronto Star who has written on international affairs for over 16 years, beginning as the Star’s UN correspondent and reporting from countries around the globe. Olivia has led the Moscow and London bureaus for the Star and has reported from the former Soviet Union, South Asia, and the Middle East, and on conflict zones including Chechnya, Tajikistan, Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan, Kosovo, Serbia, Iraq, and Israel and Palestine.

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies.

 

Thursday, September 15, 4-6 pm

Oleh Wolowyna (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill): What Do We Really Know About the Holodomor: New Research Results

Chair: Frank Sysyn (CIUS, University of Alberta)

Dr. Wolowyna will speak about the results of recent research conducted by a team of demographers from Ukraine and the US.  In-depth analysis of available data and recently discovered documents put in question some popular believes about the Holodomor.  Also a comparative analysis of 1932-1934 famine losses at the regional level in Ukraine and of recent estimates of regional losses in Russia provide a new perspective on the Holodomor in particular and the 1932-1934 famine in general.  

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta; the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.


Thursday, October 20, 4-6 pm

Aleksandra (Ola) Hnatiuk (Professor in Culture Studies, University of Warsaw):

Cooperation between Poles, Jews, and Ukrainians in L'viv during WWII

Chair: Maxim Tarnawsky (Professor at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto)

During WWII Lviv experienced a variety of traumatic occupations that disrupted the balance of relations between its major ethnic inhabitants, Poles, Jews, and Ukrainians. Prof Hnatiuk explores the myths, the animosities, and the interactions between these groups during the war years, dispelling many of the presumed truths about irremediable hostility and conflicts. Her focus is on the relations between individuals as documented in personal archives rather than on collective perceptions and activities.

Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Wednesday, October 26, 5-7 pm

Yohanan Petrovsky Shtern (the Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies, Northwestern University):

What Ukrainians and Jews Know and What They Do Not Know About Each Other

There is much that ordinary Ukrainians do not know about Jews and that ordinary Jews do not know about Ukrainians. As a result, those Jews and Ukrainians who may care about their respective ancestral heritages usually view each other through distorted stereotypes, misperceptions, and biases. This talk sheds new light on highly controversial moments of Ukrainian-Jewish relations and argues that the historical experience in Ukraine not only divided ethnic Ukrainians and Jews but also brought them together.

Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern is the Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies and Professor of History in the History Department at Northwestern University, Chicago. He has authored a number of prize-winning books, including The Golden Age Shtetl (Princeton University Press, 2015). His research and publications have been supported by a number of foundations, including the Rothschild, Jewish Memorial, DAAD, Kosziuszko, Lady Davis, and National Endowment for the Humanities. He has taught at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv. For his pedagogical and scholarly contribution, he has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the University “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy” in Kyiv.

Jackman Humanities Building, Room 100A
170 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario, M5R 2M8

Registration is not required for this event.

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies; Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies; the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies; the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and Ukrainian Jewish Encounter.

Thursday, October 27, 4-7 pm

Jews and Ukrainians: A Millennium of Co-Existence

A panel discussion on the civic and scholarly significance of the book, Jews and Ukrainians: A Millennium of Co-Existence, co-authored by Professor Paul Robert Magocsi (University of Toronto) and Professor Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern (Northwestern University), and published by University of Toronto Press.

Chair:

Professor Doris Bergen
Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies, University of Toronto

Commentators:

Frank Sysyn (CIUS, University of Alberta); Professor Ori Yehudai (Department of History, University of Toronto); Professor Anna Shternshis (Director, Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto)

Respondents:

Professor Paul Robert Magocsi (Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto); Professor Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern (The Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies, Northwestern University)

Vivian & David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3K7

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies; Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies; the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies; the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and Ukrainian Jewish Encounter.


Friday, October 28, 1-5.30 pm

Conference: Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in Comparative Historical Perspective

The conference will bring together presenters on the Irish (Peter Gray, Queen’s University, Belfast), Bengal (Janam Mukherjee, Ryerson University), and Ukrainian (Liudmyla Hrynevych, Academy of Sciences, Ukraine) famines and examine differences and commonalities (Mark von Hagen, Arizona State University and Andrea Graziosi, Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of University and Research).

Knox College, 23 King's College Circle/St. George St., University of Toronto

Register here

Sponsored by the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta; the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Saturday, October 29, 4-6 pm

Liudmyla Hrynevych (Director of the Holodomor Research and Education Centre in Kyiv and Senior Scholar at the Institute of the History of Ukraine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine): The Holodomor and the Language of Hate in Stalinist Propaganda

Dr. Hrynevych will discuss propaganda in the context of the Holodomor.

Please note that the lecture will be in Ukrainian.

St. Vladimir Institute, 620 Spadina Avenue

Register here

Sponsored by the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta; the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Friday, November 4, 2.30-5.30 pm

Chornobyl 30 Years After: Energy, Environment, Policy

The explosion at the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant on April 26, 1986 continues to have serious economic, social, and biological consequences for the inhabitants of the affected territories and beyond. The problems caused by the disaster in Ukraine and policies developed to address them have been further complicated by geopolitical conflict and the economic and humanitarian crisis this conflict has precipitated. To commemorate the 30th anniversary of the disaster, this panel brings together scholars to discuss issues such as the future nuclear energy in Ukraine, the impact of radiation on wildlife in Chornobyl’s exclusion zone, and the management of displaced people. In situating their research, panelists will draw comparisons between the Chornobyl and Fukushima accidents, and between the Chornobyl accident and Ukraine’s Anti-Terrorist Operation.

Presentations:

David Marples (Professor, Department of History and Classics, University of Alberta): Chernobyl and the Future of Nuclear Power in Ukraine

Tim Mousseau (Professor of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina): Do Nuclear Accidents Generate a “Garden of Eden” for Wildlife? Lessons from the Chernobyl and Fukushima Disasters

Alexander Belyakov (Ph.D., Certified Sustainability Professional. The Roots Collaborative, Founding Member): A Humanitarian Crisis after the Chernobyl Disaster and the Anti-terrorist Operation (ATO) in Ukraine: What do They Have in Common?

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.


Thursday, November 10, 2-4 pm

Lyuba Yakimchuk (Ukrainian poet): Decomposition: Poetry in a Time of War

Lyuba Yakimchuk, a Ukrainian poet, screenwriter and journalist, was born in Eastern Ukraine, in Pervomaisk, Luhansk oblast. She is the author of several full-length poetry collections, including Like FASHION and Apricots of Donbas.

Lyuba will be reading works from her most recent collection and discussing her poems as a reflection of the ongoing trauma resulting from the war in Eastern Ukraine. (In Ukrainian with simultaneous English translation.)

Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Danylo Husar Struk Program in Ukrainian Literature of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.


Friday, November 11, 7-9 pm

Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture

Serhii Plokhy (Mykhailo S. Hrushevs'kyi Professor of Ukrainian History; Director, Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard University):

The Fields of Sorrow: Mapping the Great Ukrainian Famine

The Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture began in 1998 at the initiative of the Famine-Genocide Commemorative Committee of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch. Past lecturers have included James Mace, Norman Naimark, Alexander Motyl, Anne Applebaum, and Tymothy Snyder.

Vivian & David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3K7

Register here

Sponsored by the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies, and the Ukrainian Canadian Congress (Toronto branch).

 

Friday, November 18, 7-9 pm

Film Screening "Hollywood on the Dnieper"

Presentation of the new documentary film “Hollywood on the Dnieper” (2016, in Ukrainian with English subtitles) by the noted Kyivan film director Oleh Chornyi. Introduction by Dr. Marko Stech (Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Alberta and York University)  

St. Vladimir Institute (620 Spadina Ave., Toronto)

No registration is required. Information: (416) 923-3318, ext. 104

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at the University of Toronto and St. Vladimir Institute.

Friday, December 2, 3-5 pm

Myroslav Shkandrij (Professor of Slavic Studies, University of Manitoba): Contemporary Ukrainian Nationalism and the Wartime OUN: Changing Cultural Memory

Ukrainian nationalism has been a hot-button issue during Maidan protests and the conflict with Putin's Russia. This presentation looks at how the term is interpreted, whether contemporary nationalism can be linked to the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) of the Second World War, and how cultural memory is reshaping attitudes toward the 1930s and 1940s.

Myroslav Shkandrij is Professor of Slavic Studies at the University of Manitoba. He is author of Ukrainian Nationalism: Politics, Ideology and Literature, 1929-1956 (Yale University Press, 2015), which has been awarded the Canadian Association of Slavists Book Prize for 2016.  His other books include Jews in Ukrainian Literature: Representation and Identity (Yale University Press, 2009), and Russia and Ukraine: Literature and the Discourse of Empire (McGill-Queens University Press, 2001). He has published numerous articles on literature, art of the avant-garde in the 1920s, and nationalism, and has curated three art exhibitions:  Propaganda and Slogans: The Political Poster in Soviet Ukraine, 1919-1921 (New York: The Ukrainian Museum, 2013), Futurism and After: David Burliuk, 1882-1967 (Winnipeg and Hamilton Art Galleries, 2008-9), and The Phenomenon of the Ukrainian Avant-Garde, 1910-35 (Winnipeg and Hamilton Art Galleries, 2001-2). His translations include Serhiy Zhadan’s Depeche Mode (Glagoslav Publications, 2013) and Mykola Khvylovy’s Cultural Renaissance in UkraineL Polemical Pamphlets, 1925-26 (Edmonton: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, 1986).

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Thursday, February 9, 5 pm

Dr. Markian Dobczansky (Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow): A Historical Perspective on the Ukraine Crisis: States, Stability, and the Soviet Legacy

Frozen and unfrozen conflicts have been a persistent feature of the Eurasian political landscape since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Breakaway regions and civil wars have affected no fewer than seven former Soviet republics, calling into question the stability and durability of these independent states. Yet each of the conflicts has a particular historical background that can help illuminate the challenges faced by these states. The Ukraine crisis is no exception. This talk will focus on the history of Soviet state and nation building in Ukraine, arguing that the peculiarities of the Soviet legacy have contributed to the Ukrainian state’s strengths and weaknesses.

Dr. Markian Dobczansky is a historian of the Soviet Union. His specializations include Russian-Ukrainian relations, Soviet nationalities policy, and the politics of culture. He is currently the Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow in Ukrainian Politics, Culture, and Society at the University of Toronto, where he teaches a course on comparative nationalisms in Russia and Ukraine. He has conducted archival research in Moscow, Kyiv, Kharkiv, Washington, D.C., and at the Hoover Institution in California. Dr. Dobczansky is working on a book manuscript about the intersection between Soviet, Ukrainian, and local identity in Kharkiv in the twentieth century. He has presented his research at academic conferences in the United States, Ukraine, Russia, and Lithuania. Dr. Dobczansky received a Ph.D. in history from Stanford University, where he focused on the Soviet Union, Russian Empire, and Eastern Europe. His dissertation “From Soviet Heartland to Ukrainian Borderland: Searching for Identity in Kharkiv, 1943—2004” utilized Soviet archival sources, published materials, and interviews to examine local identity in Ukraine’s second largest city over the second half of the twentieth century. While writing his dissertation, he received a Mellon pre-doctoral fellowship at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He received a B.A. in European History and German Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. He was born in Silver Spring, Maryland.

The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs

Register here

This event is part of the 2017 CERES Graduate Student Conference, which is sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies: Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine; Ethnic and Pluralism Studies; Hungarian Studies Program; Department of Political Science; Department of History, and Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Wednesday, February 15, 4-6 pm

Dr. Simone Bellezza (Petro Jacyk Research Award Recipient): The ‘Transnationalization’ of Ukrainian Dissent: Human Rights and Ukrainian Diasporas in the 1960s-1980s

Chair: Lucan Way (Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program)

This talk will be an account of my ongoing research project on the relationship between Ukrainian diaspora communities and their original homeland during and after the Cold War. It will focus on the reception of the Ukrainian dissent by the younger generations of the Ukrainian diaspora (especially in the US) and on the ways these younger Ukrainian-Americans tried to change the relationship with Soviet Ukraine. The analysis will address the question of the multiculturalism of these second-generation Ukrainian Americans aiming at a working definition of otherwise ambiguous concepts such as “transnationalism” and “diaspora.”

Simone Attilio Bellezza completed two PhDs: the first one at the University Ca' Foscari of Venice, where he defended a dissertation on the German civil administration of Dnipropetrovs’k region during World War II, and the second at the University of the Republic of San Marino, where he wrote a dissertation on the Ukrainian dissent during the 1950s and 1960s. He specialized in Soviet and particularly Ukrainian history, and the fil rouge of his work is the study of national identity and its relationship with other kinds of loyalty (social, political, cultural, and religious).

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Tuesday, March 7, 4-6 pm

Olga Zelinska (Petro Jacyk International Visiting Graduate Student): Possible But Not Inevitable: Emergence of Violent Contentious Repertoire in Ukraine

Chair: Lucan Way (Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program)

The events of winter 2013-2014 in Ukraine were special in many respects. Not only Euromaidan took many by surprise – neither the government nor the experts saw it coming.  These also were the largest protests by far in the Independent Ukraine, bringing together a broad coalition of collective actors and spreading to all Ukrainian regions. But the eventual victory of the Revolution of Dignity came at a price. In two months of protest the camp in capital Kyiv abandoned its non-violent philosophy for Molotov cocktails. In few more weeks it ended with special police forces opening fire on protesters leaving more than a hundred dead. Unprecedented violence led to high level defections and dissolution of Viktor Yanukovych’s regime. Why did Ukrainian contentious repertoire, proudly non-violent starting from 1960-ies dissidents adopted the violent tactics? The presentation explores the gradual emergence of radical repertoire among Ukrainian protesters and the dynamics of violence taking up the central stage in Kyiv in January 2014. I use available data to illustrate these processes in the invert order – starting with the ‘Moment of Madness’ on Maidan on February 20th
2014 and going back in time, tracing some conditions which made it possible, but not inevitable.

Olga Zelinska is a PhD student in Sociology at the Graduate School for Social Research, Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland. The topic of her thesis is “Local Maidan across Ukraine: History, Conditions and Impact.” Previously, she graduated in Public Policy from Central European University, Budapest, Hungary (M.A.) and in Political Science from Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsy National University, Chernivtsy, Ukraine (M.A.). In her research Olga empirically examines the social and political conditions of Ukrainian Maidan as they occurred in localities throughout the period 2013-2014, and their impact on local and national governance thereafter. 

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Thursday, March 16, 7-9 pm

Public screening of "Music of Survival: The Story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus" with the introduction by producer/director Orest Sushko

The story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus is one of courage and true grit – a vivid chronicle that celebrates the human spirit. This is the triumphant story of the original 17 members of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus who survived World War II as a musical ensemble. The film brings out the deepest roots of a fragile tradition, celebrating the resiliency of a music culture that has survived centuries. Set against the backdrop of the war itself, the story reveals the ways that music and musicians are used and abused by political regimes. It provides an educational, informative and compelling perspective – the personal stories of the last two survivors inter cut with the collective history of the bandura throughout the ages. Interwoven with contemporary musical performances, the film illustrates the bandurist as bard, as seer, as spiritual emissary for the soul of the Ukrainian people, then and now, in Ukraine and beyond.

Orest Sushko is a member of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus, following in the footsteps of his father Makar Sushko, the first Canadian member of the Chorus in 1949 – and grandfather Paul Stepowy, a bandura craftsman and honorary patron of the Chorus. As an Emmy award-winning Re-recording mixer in both film and television, Orest has worked with a broad range of directors from David Cronenberg to Barry Sonnenfeld to Guillermo del Toro – television series including Orphan Black and documentaries from David Suzuki, to The North FaceThe Patagonia and Alan Doyle of  Great Big Sea.

Media Commons Theatre, John P. Robarts Research Library (130 St. George Street)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

 

Friday, March 24 and Saturday, March 25

Conference: A Century of Ukrainian Statehoods  

Day 1, March 24

Panel 1: What Was the Revolution in Ukraine?
9:45–11:45 a.m.
“Ukrainians in 1917. Not so Rural and not so Russified”
Stephen Velychenko. Research Fellow, Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

“‘The Most Unconquerable Stronghold of Our Rightlessness will be Captured:’ Jews between Emancipation, Ukrainization, and Pogroms in 1917”
Mihaly Kalman. Postdoctoral Fellow in Jewish Studies, Central European University

“Kyiv Amidst the Revolutions of 1917: Society and Politics in the Public Sphere”
Roman Tashlitskyy, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto

Panel 2: Building the Soviet Ukrainian State in the 1920s and 1930s
1:30–3:30 p.m.

“Reconciling the Irreconcilable? Left-Wing Ukrainian Nationalism and the Soviet Regime”
Christopher Gilley, independent scholar, Durham, U.K., and author of The “Change of Signposts” in the Ukrainian Emigration: A Contribution to the History of Sovietophilism in the 1920s

“Chronicling the Jewish Attitude Toward Ukrainian Statehood: Writing and Rewriting Bolshevik History in the 1920s”
Myroslav Shkandrij, Professor, Department of German and Slavic Studies, University of Manitoba

Day 2, March 25

Panel 3: Soviet State-Building and Ukrainian Culture
10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

“What was Soviet and Ukrainian about Soviet Ukrainian Culture?”
Mayhill C. Fowler, Assistant Professor of History, Stetson University

“In Search of Own “Self”: Anticolonial Discourse of Soviet Ukrainian Cinema in the 1920s”
Yana Prymachenko, Researcher, Institute of the History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences

“Rehabilitating a Mythology: The Ukrainian SSR’s Foundational Myth after Stalin”
Markian Dobczansky, Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto

Panel 4: Toward a Consolidated Statehood? The Ukrainian SSR in the 1960s–1980s
1:30–3:30 p.m.

“Corruption and Ideological Subversion: Soviet Ukrainian Political Elites in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the 1970s–80s”
Olga Bertelsen, Research Fellow, Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute

'Making Soviet Ukraine Ukrainian': The Debate on Ukrainian Statehood in the Journal Suchasnist’ (1961-71)"
Simone Attilio Bellezza, Research Fellow, Department of Humanities, University of Trento, and Visiting Scholar, University of Toronto

“Building Socialism, Being a Professional: Everyday Life and Professional Identity in Late Soviet Ukraine”
Oleksandra Gaidai, Senior Research Fellow, Museum of History of Kyiv
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

To register for Day 1 (March 24) of the conference, please go here

To register for Day 2 (March 25) of the conference, please go here

This conference is sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine; the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; the W.K. Lypynsky East European Research Institute; The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies; Department of History; Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures.

Monday, March 27, 3-5 pm

Taras Kuzio (University of Alberta): Putin's War Against Ukraine

Dr. Taras Kuzio will give a presentation based on his book that will be published in February 2017. The West has woken up to the uncomfortable fact that Russia has long believed it is at war with them the most egregious example of which is Vladimir Putin’s hacking of the US elections. For Western governments, used to believing in the post-Cold War peace dividend, it came as a shock to find the liberal international order is under threat from an aggressive Russia. The ‘End of History – loudly proclaimed in 1991 – has been replaced by the ‘Return of History.’ Putin’s war against Ukraine came three years earlier when he launched an unprovoked war in the Donbas and annexed the Crimea. Putin’s war against Ukraine has killed 20,000 civilians, Ukrainian and Russian soldiers and combatants, forced a third of the population of the Donbas to flee, illegally nationalised Ukrainian state and private entities in the Crimea, destroyed huge areas of the infrastructure and economy of the Donbas, and created a black hole of crime and soft security threats to Europe. Putin’s war against Ukraine is the first book length study of how Russian nationalism, chauvinism, anti-Semitism and crime are driving Putin’s belief that Russians and Ukrainians are ‘one people’ forever united in the Russian World. Written by Taras Kuzio, a leading authority on contemporary Ukraine, Putin’s War Against Ukraine is a product of his long-term expertise in Ukrainian politics, fieldwork in the Russian-speaking eastern and southern Ukraine and his visits to the front lines of the Donbas combat zone. The book debunks the myths surrounding Europe’s biggest crisis since World War II and provides an incisive analysis for policy makers, journalists and scholars as to why Putin is at war with the West and Ukraine.

Taras Kuzio has analysed crime, corruption, politics, and nationalism in the USSR, Ukraine, Russia and Eurasia for over three decades as a journalist, consultant and academic. Educated in the UK, he received a BA in Economics from the University of Sussex, MA in Soviet and Eastern European Studies from the University of London, and Phd in political science from University of Birmingham, UK. He was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University. Currently a Senior Research Associate at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, and a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University. Previously he has held positions as a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Slavic Research Center, Hokkaido University, Japan, Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation Senior Fellow at the School of Advanced International Studies, John Hopkins University, Visiting Professor at the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University and Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK. Taras Kuzio has been a consultant to different branches of the US government, including team leader on a USAID spring 2015 assessment of democracy, governance and human rights in Ukraine. He has prepared expert testimony in political asylum cases and consultancy on oligarchs, corporate raiding and due diligence for legal and business clients. As a public intellectual he has been a frequent guest on television, radio and print media, including during the Euromaidan, Russian invasion of the Crimea and the Donbas conflict. Over a 3-decade journalistic career he has authored 1, 400 articles on post-communist, Ukrainian and Russian politics and international affairs for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Al Jazeera, Financial Times, UPI (United Press International), New Eastern Europe, and specialist publications by Jane’s Information Group and Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty. His most recent book Ukraine: Democratization, Corruption and the New Russian Imperialism (June 2015) surveys modern Ukrainian political history from 1953 to the present. In 2013-2016, he undertook 15 visits to eastern Ukraine and the Donbas conflict zone to research the book Putin’s War Against Ukraine: Revolution, Nationalism, and Crime (2017). He is the author and editor of an additional 15 books, including Open Ukraine. Changing Course towards a European Future Democratic Revolution in Ukraine (2011), From Kuchmagate to Orange Revolution (2009), Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives on Nationalism (2007) and Ukraine-Crimea-Russia: Triangle of Conflict (2007). Dr. Kuzio has guest edited 12 special issues of academic journals Problems of Post-Communism, East European Politics and Society, Nationalities Papers, Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics and Communist and Post-Communist Studies and authored over 100 think tank monographs, book chapters, and scholarly articles.

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Register here

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

Wednesday, April 19, 4-6 pm

Myroslava Antonovych (the Director of the Centre for International Human Rights and Associate Professor of the Faculty of Law, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy"): The Holodomor - Genocide Against the Ukrainian Nation in the Context of World Genocides

Chair: Andrij Makuch (HREC Associate Director of Research and Publication, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office)

Although comparative genocide as the second generation of genocide studies has developed over the past two decades, the Holodomor as a crime of genocide committed by Stalin's regime has not been examined in comparative perspective. In her presentation, Dr. Myroslava Antonovych will trace the reasons for this situation and will offer a comparative analysis of the Holodomor with examples of genocide in the first half of the XX century--namely, the Armenian genocide of the Ottoman Empire and the Holocaust of Nazi Germany. The speaker will compare the three genocides as crimes under international law in terms of the mental (mens rea) and material (actus reus) elements of genocide that characterize each of them, noting the dissimilarities and similarities in intent, the perspectives of the victims and perpetrators, and the acts perpetrated. The key common element in the genocides perpetrated in the Ottoman Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Third Reich is that state organization was substituted by hegemony of a ruling party: the Ittihadists, the Communists, and the Nazis. The importance of comparing cases of genocide is evident – if lessons from the past are not heeded and genocide is not punished, history will repeat itself as can be seen in the east and south (Crimea) of Ukraine, where the successor state to the Soviet Union – the Russian Federation – continues an attack on the Ukrainian nation.

Dr. Myroslava Antonovych is the Director of the Centre for International Human Rights and Associate Professor of the Faculty of Law, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”, Kyiv, Ukraine. In 2010-2014 she was a Judge ad Hoc at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. She graduated from the Faculty of Law, Lviv National University (1995) and from the English Department, Dnipropetrovsk National University in Ukraine (1981) with honors. She has LL.M. degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada (1999). Her Doctor of Law degree is from the Ukrainian Free University in Munich, Germany (2008) and Candidate of Philology degree is from Kyiv Linguistic University in Ukraine (1988). As a Fulbright scholar she conducted research on International Human Rights at the Urban and Morgan Institute for Human Rights, University of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA (1996). She is the author of about 100 books and articles in Ukraine and abroad. Her research focuses on International Human Rights and Genocide Studies. In April-May 2017, Dr. Antonovych will be the visiting professor at the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Holodomor Education and Research Consortium.

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

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Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta.

 

Friday, April 28, 3-5 pm

Panel "Ukraine Today Between War and Reform"

Speakers:

Mikheil Saakashvili (Former President of Georgia, current leader of the opposition party "Movement of New Forces" in Ukraine)

Yuriy Butusov (Ukrainian journalist, military expert and editor-in-chief of the Censor.net website)

Lyuba Shipovich (President and co-Founder of Razom for Ukraine)

Chairs: Lucan Way (Professor of Political Science and Petro Jacyk Program's co-director) and Victor Ostapchuk (Associate Professor at the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto)

Bios of the panelists:

Mikheil Saakashvili: as the 3rd president of Georgia, Mikheil Saakashvili was applauded in the West for his reforms, which transformed the country from an almost failed state to a model in the fight against corruption. But he was defeated in parliamentary elections in 2012. Now he’s back – not in his native Georgia but as Ukrainian politician. In 2015 he was appointed by President Petro Poroshenko as his top foreign policy adviser and head of Ukraine’s Advisory International Council on Reforms. Then a Governor of Odessa Region. But when all of his attempts to transform the system in at least one region failed, Mikheil created an opposition party “Movement of New Forces” which has now officially been registered in Ukraine.

Yuriy Butusov: Ukrainian journalist, military expert and editor-in-chief of the Censor.net website, Yuriy Butusov has worked for the newspapers Kijevskije Vedomosti and Zerkalo nedeli (Weekly Mirror). In 2004 Butusov started the website Censor.net and is its editor. This online project is one of the most popular news portals in Ukraine. He wrote the screenplay for the film Orange Sky and produced the film Illusion of Fear. Yuriy Butusov is a journalist who reports on incisive social topics and conducts journalistic research. He has exposed many corruption cases and other crimes committed by the power elite. Censor.net, which was created by Butusov is among the most popular Ukrainian news portal. The main topic covered by Butusov currently is the situation in Ukraine – Russia’s aggression and the military activities in Donbas.

Lyuba Shipovich: in January 2016 Lyuba Shipovich, President and Co-Founder of Razom for Ukraine, was named one of top 50 developers of New York City. She has developed a software called “OKO”: a media monitoring project, which automatically gathers all mentions on Ukraine in foreign media, grades by social rating (likes, shares, comments), and manually (by team of editors) prepares daily and weekly reports for the UN representatives, diplomats, politicians, media etc. In her effort to help reform Ukraine, she led the implementation of electronic record keeping and e-service systems in Odesa region of Ukraine. Brought the region to the 1st place in the investment efficiency rating, implementation of the Google program “Digital transformation of Odesa”.

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Vivian & David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3K7

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, Canada-Ukraine International Assistance Fund, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.



Friday, May 5, 3-5 pm

Oleh Havrylyshyn (Adjunct Professor of Economics, George Washington University; member of the Economic Advisory Council to Ukraine's Minister of Economics and the Presidential Administration): Book launch of "Political Economy of Independent Ukraine: Late Starts, False Starts and Last Chance?"

Ukraine continues to be in the news since Independence with its early economic disappointments, its two people – revolutions, and of course the military aggression by Russia. This book has two main objectives. First, it describes the process of economic reforms and performance since independence. Second, it proposes several hypotheses as to why market reforms have been so slow and incomplete, and economic performance has lagged far behind that of the Central European countries. In doing so it puts forth a number of revisionist theories. The main economic difficulties were not, as many leaders argued, Ukraine’s unique impedimenta, but the decision at the very beginning to delay reforms. Oligarch development resulted from this late start, and is therefore not attributable to the Kuchma period alone as many analysts write, but started with the Kravchuk regime. One piece of evidence for that is that most of todays’ oligarchs started their business before 1994. Furthemore, delayed reforms allowed Russia to use it leverage over energy supplies to Ukraine’s detriment-but not coincidentally for the benefit of many early oligarchs. Finally, despite the incomplete reforms, standards of living of Ukrainians is not lower than they were in the Soviet period –that is simply a myth due to improper use of standard GDP statistics.

Oleh Havrylyshyn is an economist with a diverse career including academia, Government as Deputy Minister of Finance of Ukraine, a senior official at the Board of Directors and management of the IMF. His numerous writings on transition have been widely cited. In 2014-2016, he was an advisor to senior officials of the Ukrainian Government.

Register here

Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)

Sponsored by the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies.

 

   
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